Hot Best Seller

The Third Bank of the River: Power and Survival in the Twenty-First-Century Amazon

Availability: Ready to download

A sweeping look at the war over the Amazon--as activists, locals, and indigenous tribes struggle to save it from the threat of loggers, drug lords, and corrupt cops and politicians Following doctors and detectives, environmental activists and indigenous tribes, The Third Bank of the River traces the history of the Amazon from the arrival of the first Spanish flotilla to the A sweeping look at the war over the Amazon--as activists, locals, and indigenous tribes struggle to save it from the threat of loggers, drug lords, and corrupt cops and politicians Following doctors and detectives, environmental activists and indigenous tribes, The Third Bank of the River traces the history of the Amazon from the arrival of the first Spanish flotilla to the drones that are now mapping unexplored parts of the forest. Grounded in rigorous firsthand reporting and in-depth research, Chris Feliciano Arnold reveals a portrait of Brazil and the Amazon that is complex, bloody, and often tragic. During the 2014 world cup, an isolated Amazon tribe emerged from the rain forest on the misty border of Peru and Brazil, escaping massacre at the hands of loggers who wanted their land. A year later, in the jungle capital of Manaus, a bloody weekend of reprisal killings inflame a drug war that has blurred the line between cops and kingpins. Both events reveal the dual struggles of those living in and around the world's largest river. As indigenous tribes lose their ancestral culture and territory to the lure and threat of the outside world, the question arises of how best to save isolated tribes: Keep them away from the modern world or make contact in an effort to save them from extinction? As Brazil looks to be a world leader in the twenty-first century, this magnificent and vast region is mired in chaos and violence that echoes the atrocities that have haunted the rain forest since Europeans first traveled its waters.


Compare

A sweeping look at the war over the Amazon--as activists, locals, and indigenous tribes struggle to save it from the threat of loggers, drug lords, and corrupt cops and politicians Following doctors and detectives, environmental activists and indigenous tribes, The Third Bank of the River traces the history of the Amazon from the arrival of the first Spanish flotilla to the A sweeping look at the war over the Amazon--as activists, locals, and indigenous tribes struggle to save it from the threat of loggers, drug lords, and corrupt cops and politicians Following doctors and detectives, environmental activists and indigenous tribes, The Third Bank of the River traces the history of the Amazon from the arrival of the first Spanish flotilla to the drones that are now mapping unexplored parts of the forest. Grounded in rigorous firsthand reporting and in-depth research, Chris Feliciano Arnold reveals a portrait of Brazil and the Amazon that is complex, bloody, and often tragic. During the 2014 world cup, an isolated Amazon tribe emerged from the rain forest on the misty border of Peru and Brazil, escaping massacre at the hands of loggers who wanted their land. A year later, in the jungle capital of Manaus, a bloody weekend of reprisal killings inflame a drug war that has blurred the line between cops and kingpins. Both events reveal the dual struggles of those living in and around the world's largest river. As indigenous tribes lose their ancestral culture and territory to the lure and threat of the outside world, the question arises of how best to save isolated tribes: Keep them away from the modern world or make contact in an effort to save them from extinction? As Brazil looks to be a world leader in the twenty-first century, this magnificent and vast region is mired in chaos and violence that echoes the atrocities that have haunted the rain forest since Europeans first traveled its waters.

30 review for The Third Bank of the River: Power and Survival in the Twenty-First-Century Amazon

  1. 5 out of 5

    Brent

    Arnold, adopted as a child from Brazil, returns as a journalist, and captures much cultural conflict, crime, and ferment in clear journalism and memoir. Many stories intertwine: gang wars, the death of cultures including the Yanomamo, political history, and Arnold's personal life. Highly recommended.

  2. 3 out of 5

    Lou

    You just can’t make these things up, the whole terribleness within, the corruption, the crimes, this narrative, truth things that past and still go on upon this earth. Reporting with plenty of heart and passion with clarity in writing. He went in deep sometimes crossing the thin line between life and death, he returned to his first home, in search of a world he wants to understand of the cause and effect of certain events, conditions of people and histories. Terrible fate of humans in this narrativ You just can’t make these things up, the whole terribleness within, the corruption, the crimes, this narrative, truth things that past and still go on upon this earth. Reporting with plenty of heart and passion with clarity in writing. He went in deep sometimes crossing the thin line between life and death, he returned to his first home, in search of a world he wants to understand of the cause and effect of certain events, conditions of people and histories. Terrible fate of humans in this narrative. There is a search for truth behind one Bloody Weekend of July 17 2015, he meticulously researched through reports, “Hundreds of pages of police reports, eyewitness accounts, and autopsies. Hours of grainy surveillance video, murders captured from a dozen angles. Endless wiretaps and cell phone screen captures, the story of how monsters are born.” The reader will learn of the plight of people, against webs and layers of entanglement, corruptions and atrocities, in no words wasted writing, all layered out in easy reading style, in this passionate heart guided honest search of Amazonian histories.  Excerpts @ https://more2read.com/review/the-third-bank-of-the-river-by-chris-feliciano-arnold/

  3. 4 out of 5

    Oona

    Terrific combination of reportage and roots narrative. An up-to-date look at the world of LOST CITY OF Z.

  4. 3 out of 5

    Ryan Weber

    Through a combination of reporting and memoir, Arnold does an amazing job bringing the struggles and culture of Brazil to life. An eye-opening and engaging book!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Phineas James

    The Third Bank of the River is a part personal, part investigative look into the unique social, political, and historical dynamics of the world's most uncharted region. Arnold weaves his own story of discovery - of his own background of adoption - with interviews and observations compiled across multiple trips to Brazil's jungle hinterland. His book provides more questions than answers, but that's to be expected considering the tumultuous history of Brazil and its fretted colonial history.

  6. 5 out of 5

    William

    Fantastic reporting of various issues in the Brazilian Amazon. Many texts will do the thinking for you. They will report not only the facts but how they synthesize together into some conspiratorial turmoil that feels hopeless. Chris Arnold does a fabulous job leaving a more subtle sense of urgency that keeps open the doors of hope. His personal story drags us into our interest and the reporting makes us wonder about our own country and what this might mean for us as well as Brazil. What isn’t sa Fantastic reporting of various issues in the Brazilian Amazon. Many texts will do the thinking for you. They will report not only the facts but how they synthesize together into some conspiratorial turmoil that feels hopeless. Chris Arnold does a fabulous job leaving a more subtle sense of urgency that keeps open the doors of hope. His personal story drags us into our interest and the reporting makes us wonder about our own country and what this might mean for us as well as Brazil. What isn’t said or assumed is what makes this such a strong and engaging read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Caryn

    The writing in this book grabbed and kept me reading as much as the details of the narrative (current and historical). Truth be told, I had a hard time getting enough sleep for the next day once I picked up the book. There's particular care given to honesty about the author's own experiences/perspectives, and the land and people around him. This is not only an important read, but a human, beautifully written one.

  8. 3 out of 5

    Jay

    Written by my son's college friend. He covered several different aspects of Brazil; many of which will discourage you from wanting to visit. The author had more nerves than the average tourist. Think I would rather go back to visit my college experience in Buenos Aires, but Rio Grande do Sul would be OK, too.

  9. 3 out of 5

    Kim Bakos

    I wanted to read this since everyone knows how important the Amazon is to the whole planet. You can't be a parent and not know "the Amazon is the lungs of Earth". But like many educational books, it is one that I learned from but didn't really enjoy. There wasn't any focus on why the Amazon is important - the flora and fauna, the water itself, etc... I was hoping to learn more about that. Instead, was was about who is struggling for the power of the area. The politics and drugs were of little int I wanted to read this since everyone knows how important the Amazon is to the whole planet. You can't be a parent and not know "the Amazon is the lungs of Earth". But like many educational books, it is one that I learned from but didn't really enjoy. There wasn't any focus on why the Amazon is important - the flora and fauna, the water itself, etc... I was hoping to learn more about that. Instead, was was about who is struggling for the power of the area. The politics and drugs were of little interest to me. I did enjoy the stories about the indigenous tribes buried deep in the forest, and also the stories of the people in the rural areas that were now being developed and how it is impacting their lives. For me, everything is all about people, so when the people were the focus of the book, it was much more meaningful to me.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mehdi Okasi

    I so enjoyed this book! It’s not only a vivid and urgent history of Brazil and it’s progress into the 21st century, but it’s told with a voice at once intimate and searching, which made this reader feel the author’s lived and carefully researched experience. This is story of homecoming wherein the author understands completely the luck that afforded him the opportunity to tell this story in the first place. But his personal story never overshadows the sweeping story of the Brazilian Amazon and t I so enjoyed this book! It’s not only a vivid and urgent history of Brazil and it’s progress into the 21st century, but it’s told with a voice at once intimate and searching, which made this reader feel the author’s lived and carefully researched experience. This is story of homecoming wherein the author understands completely the luck that afforded him the opportunity to tell this story in the first place. But his personal story never overshadows the sweeping story of the Brazilian Amazon and the diverse peoples of this country and the many conflicts that have shaped it as the nation we know today. The grace with which Feliciano Arnold tells this story makes me feel the pulse of history as it beats in the wild heart of its jungles and it’s contentious expansion of its cities. Highly recommend this read!

  11. 4 out of 5

    RedandGonzo

    Arnold seamlessly weaves his experiences with history of the people and cultures of Brazil. I didn’t expect to learn so much about Brazil, and I was captivated from beginning to end. Arnold’s writing is invigorating and beautifully crafted, and I would highly recommend this book to anyone.

  12. 3 out of 5

    Matt

    Awesome job weaving journalism and personal experiences into something educational, pleasurably readable, and relevant all at the same time.

  13. 5 out of 5

    John

    Having lived in the Rio area in Brazil for six months of my life, though not continuously, I find things Brazil perk my interest. Here is a somewhat depressing read. Rain forest demise. Isolated native tribes ravaged. Law and order absent. I like author's first-person narrative as he travels throughout the Amazon. Essentially a gringo even though born in Brazil, he admits that while doing his research he sometimes he felt he was sightseeing through a Hollywood lens. He's distressed to find so mu Having lived in the Rio area in Brazil for six months of my life, though not continuously, I find things Brazil perk my interest. Here is a somewhat depressing read. Rain forest demise. Isolated native tribes ravaged. Law and order absent. I like author's first-person narrative as he travels throughout the Amazon. Essentially a gringo even though born in Brazil, he admits that while doing his research he sometimes he felt he was sightseeing through a Hollywood lens. He's distressed to find so much political and economic corruption. Police, heavily militarized, on the take. Brutal atrocities by drug lords. An "angel" helps him reunite with his birth mother in Belo Horizonte. Nevertheless, "I will always be a visitor in that bighearted country."

  14. 3 out of 5

    Amanda Hoch

    GREAT READ! Smooth, informative story. I learned lots about the cultural dynamics and sociology of the Brazilian Amazon. I appreciate his objective approach in fact finding and reporting. His experiences connecting him to his birth country and mother are an extra touch. I loved it and HIGHLY recommend it!

  15. 5 out of 5

    gnarlyhiker

    to avoid making this my 8th DNF, resulted in mastering the evelyn wood speed of reading to finish. 2.5 good luck

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mimi

    Excellent overview of tragedies in Brazil both culturally and political. I'm hoping to read more from this author.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jo Dasher

    The plot is interesting, but the prose and the author’s point of view is what pulled me in. Finished it in a weekend!

  18. 3 out of 5

    Roman

  19. 3 out of 5

    Tom Shull

  20. 5 out of 5

    Lesley Chu

  21. 4 out of 5

    SibylM

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Widdowson

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ken

  24. 3 out of 5

    Nico

  25. 3 out of 5

    Mauricio Santoro

  26. 3 out of 5

    Doris Moore

  27. 5 out of 5

    Scott Ireland

  28. 4 out of 5

    Danny Lapin

  29. 3 out of 5

    Cody Pape

  30. 4 out of 5

    Adrian

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.