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Wrong in All the Right Ways

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Everything in Emma's life has always gone according to her very careful plans. But things take a turn toward the unexpected when she falls in love for the first time with the one person in the world who’s off-limits–her new foster brother, the gorgeous and tormented Dylan McAndrews. Meanwhile, Emma’s AP English class is reading Wuthering Heights, and she’s been assigned to Everything in Emma's life has always gone according to her very careful plans. But things take a turn toward the unexpected when she falls in love for the first time with the one person in the world who’s off-limits–her new foster brother, the gorgeous and tormented Dylan McAndrews. Meanwhile, Emma’s AP English class is reading Wuthering Heights, and she’s been assigned to mimic Bronte’s style in an epistolary format. With no one to confide in, she’s got a lot to write about. Emma and Dylan try to constrain their romance to the page–for fear of threatening Dylan’s chances of being adopted into another home. But the strength of first love is all-consuming, and they soon get enveloped in a passionate, secretive relationship with a very uncertain outcome.


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Everything in Emma's life has always gone according to her very careful plans. But things take a turn toward the unexpected when she falls in love for the first time with the one person in the world who’s off-limits–her new foster brother, the gorgeous and tormented Dylan McAndrews. Meanwhile, Emma’s AP English class is reading Wuthering Heights, and she’s been assigned to Everything in Emma's life has always gone according to her very careful plans. But things take a turn toward the unexpected when she falls in love for the first time with the one person in the world who’s off-limits–her new foster brother, the gorgeous and tormented Dylan McAndrews. Meanwhile, Emma’s AP English class is reading Wuthering Heights, and she’s been assigned to mimic Bronte’s style in an epistolary format. With no one to confide in, she’s got a lot to write about. Emma and Dylan try to constrain their romance to the page–for fear of threatening Dylan’s chances of being adopted into another home. But the strength of first love is all-consuming, and they soon get enveloped in a passionate, secretive relationship with a very uncertain outcome.

30 review for Wrong in All the Right Ways

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alana • thebookishchick

    First things first, HOW INSANELY GORGEOUS IS THAT COVER?!?! I've taken so many pictures of it, it's just so damn photogenic 😁! Anyway, there's a few words that instantly sold me on this book, and those are all-consuming, passionate, and secretive. I am a sucker for all things when it comes to secret/forbidden romances. Some readers may view the foster sibling relationship as taboo but it was handled extremely well by the author. This truly reads like a YA contemporary with just enough romance, it First things first, HOW INSANELY GORGEOUS IS THAT COVER?!?! I've taken so many pictures of it, it's just so damn photogenic 😁! Anyway, there's a few words that instantly sold me on this book, and those are all-consuming, passionate, and secretive. I am a sucker for all things when it comes to secret/forbidden romances. Some readers may view the foster sibling relationship as taboo but it was handled extremely well by the author. This truly reads like a YA contemporary with just enough romance, it isn't overly done which I can totally appreciate. This is a reimagining of Wuthering Heights, and I have to say I was a little intimidated since I've never read it before, nothing a little spark notes can't fix though! Emma's class is reading Wuthering Heights and on top of that her teacher requires that they spend the first ten minutes of class writing in their journals. So what does Emma do? She writes her journal entries to Catherine, of course, which was such a nice touch to the story and where you can see the most similarities between this and Wuthering Heights. While the synopsis of this story does make it seem that this is more about a secretive relationship it is so much more than that. It's a story about Emma finding herself with the help of Dylan (her foster brother). Even though upon meeting they have an instant attraction to one another, he does help shape the person she becomes at the end of this story. She goes from being friendless and so focused on her future in the beginning of this story that by the end she has A LOT more going for her. She finds her best friend in an unlikely girl at school, joins the dance team, struggles with which college to attend, and juggles family issues all at the same time. Oh, and did I mention there's a love triangle as well? Normally, I don't like love triangles, but this one had me so torn on who I wanted Emma to be with. Meanwhile, Dylan is dealing with his own issues at the same. See what I mean about this being so much more than a love story? And while I don't want to touch too much upon his past for spoiler-y reasons, I have to say I really enjoyed his character as well. I was rooting for both Emma and Dylan together at times and individually. I absolutely loved the ending of this book, again I promise no spoilers. But I thought it was super fitting for this particular story. All in all, this was the perfect contemporary to kick off my summer with. If you're looking for a brooding, complicated, coming of age love story than look no further. Wrong in All the Right Ways was so much more than I originally expected and I can't wait to read more from this author. Blog | Twitter | Instagram

  2. 3 out of 5

    Alice-Elizabeth (marriedtobooks)

    I was contacted by the author and publisher to receive a digital copy via NetGalley for an honest review! T/W- Self-Harm, Drug Taking I actually finished reading this one a little while ago, but needed some time to sit back and digest everything I read. This is a Wuthering Heights reimagine and considering how I disliked the original Emily Bronte version, I definitely gelled with this one a lot more. The main character Emma is top of her class and trying to get into a top College to major in Engli I was contacted by the author and publisher to receive a digital copy via NetGalley for an honest review! T/W- Self-Harm, Drug Taking I actually finished reading this one a little while ago, but needed some time to sit back and digest everything I read. This is a Wuthering Heights reimagine and considering how I disliked the original Emily Bronte version, I definitely gelled with this one a lot more. The main character Emma is top of her class and trying to get into a top College to major in English. However, her world changes when a new foster brother Dylan moves in. They both end up going to the same high school and have almost virtually the same classes together. In their AP English, both have to read Bronte's Wuthering Heights and then keep a diary written during their class. Straight away, some of Emma's closet secrets are written down. Including the most difficult one of all: She has a crush on Dylan. Although I'm not the biggest fan of forbidden romances, I was pleasantly surprised by how quickly I settled in to reading. Some of the romance does happen a little quickly, however, the aspect of using a diary to keep thoughts kept the story flowing well. I wasn't a fan of Emma's parents as characters. I will say that there are love triangles in this one. But if you didn't like the original Bronte novel, this one may just float your boat!

  3. 3 out of 5

    Nikki (Book Allure)

    DNF at 62% for so many reasons, mainly because the subgenres are not for me. I have always been skeptical with contemporaries because I am more interested in fantasies but some things just can't be forced. I think this book will be appreciated by those who love high school stories and forbidden contemporary romances.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Aimee ♥ | Aimee, Always

    dnf @ 160 pages. too dramatic, too immature. nopenopenope

  5. 5 out of 5

    Joshee Kun (조수아)

    Thank you, Macmillan, for giving me an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. I've already been your sister and your girlfriend, so being your friend shouldn't be that difficult. —Emma Wrong in All the Right Ways does have a fantastic cover, but I can't say the same thing about the content. I really wanted to like this modern reimagining of Wuthering Heights, but it fell short in terms of character development, plot cohesion, and dialogue construction. Initially, I had high hopes for Em Thank you, Macmillan, for giving me an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review. I've already been your sister and your girlfriend, so being your friend shouldn't be that difficult. —Emma Wrong in All the Right Ways does have a fantastic cover, but I can't say the same thing about the content. I really wanted to like this modern reimagining of Wuthering Heights, but it fell short in terms of character development, plot cohesion, and dialogue construction. Initially, I had high hopes for Emma, the protagonist. She was a fellow nerd. Both of us took our studies seriously, loved books, and disliked children. In other words, I thought that I had found a kindred spirit. My opinion changed when Dylan, her foster brother, came into the picture. I had no qualms about the not-really-incestuous relationship, but I just couldn't tolerate the instalove, which was unsurprisingly founded on mere physical attraction. At the end of the book, Emma explained why she fell in love with Dylan. However, it was too late to salvage her lusty image. Another thing that I didn't like about Emma was her catty attitude toward her parents, her dad in particular. I understood why she resented him. I myself don't want my parents to micromanage my life. Still, Emma's dad didn't deserve to be hated. It felt like the author painted him in such a negative way just because she needed a semblance of an antagonist. My dislike for Emma increased when she toyed with Keegan, her best friend's twin brother. Honestly, male objectification is just as bad as female objectification. I believe in girl power, but how can manipulating someone be a sign of empowerment? I needn't say more. As for Dylan, I thought that his arc was pretty ironic. He got pissed off when Emma "assumed" that all foster children had a dark past. Guess what, he actually did have one. In retrospect, Dylan was your typical boy in YA contemporary: handsome, broody, and quite rebellious. Oh, and he was very good at being corny. Just recalling his cheesy conversations with Emma is making me cringe. Finally, I had a problem with the plot twist that made the last 100 pages seem like a weird Filipino soap opera. The dramas in my country are notorious for using amnesia as a plot device, so I was both surprised and annoyed. Ironically, this overrated trope made the book quite original; it was my first time to encounter it in a Western novel. Har-har. To end on a positive note, I appreciated how this book made me reflect on love's boundaries. Emma and Dylan's romantic relationship was complicated. I was confident that it was instantaneous, but I wasn't sure if it was illegal or immoral. While reading, I often wondered how such a complicated romance could be dealt with in real life. That open ending didn't help at all. Overall, Wrong in All the Right Ways deserves two stars because it has more flaws than virtues. I didn't love it, but hardcore fans of Catherine and Heathcliff might feel differently.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tiffany Brownlee

    Okay, I know I'm the author of this book, but I believe it's the best thing I have ever written :)

  7. 3 out of 5

    alice (arctic books)

    Man. In all honesty, I thought I was going to rate this 2 stars but the ending really did it for me for some reason. Full RTC!

  8. 4 out of 5

    filming.pages

    I HATED THIS BOOK. There. I said it and now I feel free. I've never felt more sad when reading a book. Never. Because I loved the synopsis of this book and I bought it immediately and I was so happy to read it and I fell in love with the cover and the fact that it was a Wuthering Heights retelling of some sorts and generally I was extremely excited for this book. Fast forward to chapter 5 and I was screaming "NO" at the top of my lungs because, guess what? Instant love!!!! Yay! WHO DOESN'T LOVE A G I HATED THIS BOOK. There. I said it and now I feel free. I've never felt more sad when reading a book. Never. Because I loved the synopsis of this book and I bought it immediately and I was so happy to read it and I fell in love with the cover and the fact that it was a Wuthering Heights retelling of some sorts and generally I was extremely excited for this book. Fast forward to chapter 5 and I was screaming "NO" at the top of my lungs because, guess what? Instant love!!!! Yay! WHO DOESN'T LOVE A GIRL THAT FALLS IN LOVE WITH A BOY AFTER ONLY 3 DAYS???? I am so mad, so so mad with the author, why did you do this??? Why?? This could have been such a good book! Anyway, Emma (the main character) falls inexplicably in love with her foster brother on the f* 3rd day and then trouble ensues. Also, she's supposedly so perfect (because in the entirety of this book she NEVER MADE A MISTAKE) but as soon as she falls in love, she's resolved to a puddle of feelings! Girl power? How about no? Apart from being so in love, Emma is an awful character. She's extremely selfish, manipulative (because guess what? She got a fake boyfriend and played with another person's feelings just so she could cover the relationship with her foster brother). Overall, she's not a good character, doesn't have good traits and there were many times when I wanted to slap her for her selfishness. Her brother was in the hospital in a comma and she was sad and angry that her parents weren't giving her enough attention! CRYBABY! Lastly, the book was cringy and totally predictable. The main characters never lost in anything, they would enter a competition and of course they'd win, the author didn't even give us the slightest doubt that maybe they wouldn't win! I think it could do with more editing, I wasn't at the edge of my seat even when the car crush happened and many romantic scenes we're extremely cringy. I don't know, I just think that it could have been so much better if it was edited better and if many changes happened on the first draft. Like, A LOT OF changes. Would I recommend this book? No. Will I read it again? No. Is the cover pretty? Yes. Does it make up for the bad story? HELL NO!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mara YA Reader Reviewer

    I am sadly disappointed. I was very much looking forward to Wrong in all the Right Ways but unfortunately this debut novel just felt “safe”. Sure the main concept of being romantically involved with a foster sibling/adoptive sibling was a risk but the delivery definitely erred on the safe side. I feel like the author should have taken more risks. Not too mention we have pretty much EVERY Young Adult trope in this one. Which is a huge turn off. It’s almost 2019 and everyone is over all these trop I am sadly disappointed. I was very much looking forward to Wrong in all the Right Ways but unfortunately this debut novel just felt “safe”. Sure the main concept of being romantically involved with a foster sibling/adoptive sibling was a risk but the delivery definitely erred on the safe side. I feel like the author should have taken more risks. Not too mention we have pretty much EVERY Young Adult trope in this one. Which is a huge turn off. It’s almost 2019 and everyone is over all these tropes. You know how you can tell a YA book is from like 2009 to 2015 just by reading the synopsis? I call it the tropes of the early 2010’s. Vampires and love triangles, plain Janes and emotionally abusive love-interests? Come on, I know you know what I’m on about. So I took the liberty of listing each trope I came across in this book, at which I rolled my eyes harder and then began to laugh as I came across one after the other. Here they are in order of appearance: -Insta love -Forbidden romance -Plain Jane -Nerdy girl falls for bad boy -Love triangle -Pretend dating -“I thought it’d be easier if you hated me” (break up because “we shouldn’t be together”) -Coma *whew* What a spin. I think I listed them all?! Now don’t get me wrong I’m not hating on all these tropes. I luuuurve me some forbidden romance—that’s the whole reason I couldn’t wait to snap this up in the first place! But I’m more of a naughty little shenaniganer and I was picturing some naughty shenanigans with some mysterious boy the parents dragged into the home. But *yawn* this one might be found on the shelves at Christian book stores. Too clean. Too dull. Too boring. The last half was just cheese. Nothing much really happens despite checking off pretty much every available trope. And I felt nothing for the characters. I literally snorted at the end. Okay though. That being said, I *would* say this would be ideal for age 13 and up to an immature/sheltered/goody-goody 17 years old. But I just don’t fall into that category so this one was not for me.

  10. 3 out of 5

    Cindy ✩☽ Savage Queen ♔

    I still need to read Wuthering Heights, but the synopsis and this artful cover have me wanting to read this right away.

  11. 3 out of 5

    Lola McCavey

    First off, this cover is absolutely stunning! How can you not want to read a book that looks this pretty?! I was lucky enough to grab an ARC of this gorgeous book at ALA Midwinter, and I'm kicking myself for waiting this long to read it because its so good! The romantic relationship on this story reminds me of Callie and Brandon's from the Fosters, so if you liked that show, you'll love this book! The forbidden romance between Emma and Dylan is such a taboo topic (with them being foster siblings First off, this cover is absolutely stunning! How can you not want to read a book that looks this pretty?! I was lucky enough to grab an ARC of this gorgeous book at ALA Midwinter, and I'm kicking myself for waiting this long to read it because its so good! The romantic relationship on this story reminds me of Callie and Brandon's from the Fosters, so if you liked that show, you'll love this book! The forbidden romance between Emma and Dylan is such a taboo topic (with them being foster siblings and all) and I appreciate how the author was careful and prudent with this subject. it wasn't overly sexual for a YA novel, and I liked that. The pacing for Emma and Dylan's romance was beleivable, too...as in things didn't move too fast with them. Most YA romances seemed rushed, but here, the pacing was just right. On another note, I also liked that Emma's storyline was about more than just her romance with Dylan. She had a lot of other things going on like school (college admissions stuff), dance, and family issues, and the author did well balancing all of that out. Lastly, even though I've never read Wuthering Heights, this book makes me want to read it. Overall, great read! When I picked it up to read, I finished it in a day. it was that good! And I'd definitely recommend to anyone looking for an amazing YA summer romance read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rae

    Wrong in All the Right Ways by Tiffany Brownlee is about forbidden love, a tough life, and bad choices. What would you do if you fell in love with someone you shouldn't fall in love with? Wrong in All the Right Ways was a very cute book! It was entertaining and easy to read. It was simply written and very reminiscent of Erin Watt (so if you're an Erin Watt fan, this one is for you!) While some phrases in the book were laden with cliches, I still enjoyed it. The pacing of the book was perfect for a Wrong in All the Right Ways by Tiffany Brownlee is about forbidden love, a tough life, and bad choices. What would you do if you fell in love with someone you shouldn't fall in love with? Wrong in All the Right Ways was a very cute book! It was entertaining and easy to read. It was simply written and very reminiscent of Erin Watt (so if you're an Erin Watt fan, this one is for you!) While some phrases in the book were laden with cliches, I still enjoyed it. The pacing of the book was perfect for a Young Adult contemporary romance--swift and packed with interesting events and tense moments. The story flowed seamlessly without any jarring time jumps, and it hooked me from the very first page. The story concept was interesting. Who doesn't love a good book about forbidden love, right? While the story concept was good, the main character, Emma, irritated me. She's supposed to be a genius, but she came off as fickle and shallow. Her relationship with Keegan was baffling, and I honestly hated how that part of the book rolled out. Though I didn't love the drama with Keegan, Emma's interactions with Dylan were wonderfully executed. I liked reading them and thought the relationship between Emma and Dylan was very sweet. The ending was okay. It's not how I would have liked to see the book end, but it was still an adequate ending that brought a good sense of closure. The characters overall were cute, though again, I wasn't a fan of Emma. I loved Dylan's character. I liked that he wasn't perfect and had a past that rocked his sense of self. He made bad choices and suffered for those choices, but overall, he was a good person. The secondary characters--the mom and dad, Keegan and Karmin--were also good. While not highly developed, they were all unique characters and easy to imagine. Should you read this book? If you enjoy Young Adult contemporaries, check it out! Thank you to the author and the publisher, Henry Holt and Co., for sending me an Advanced Reader's Copy for review purposes. 

  13. 5 out of 5

    Alexis Neuville

    Read my review on my blog: Wrong in All the Right Ways review Beautiful writing and great family dynamics, but it brought up a lot of issues I didn't really vibe with. Read the full review on Literary Lexi.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    I think this is a debut novel, so I'm going to be as lenient as possible. I believe that Brownlee has potential as a writer. There was an angst and level of emotion to the story that made me feel more like I was reading a memoir rather than something fictitious. Really, some events and details seemed so specific that I wasn't totally sure this is fiction. The foster brother - sister forbidden relationship didn't bother me -- I'm here for all the #ForbiddenRomance and normally enjoy fake-incest ero I think this is a debut novel, so I'm going to be as lenient as possible. I believe that Brownlee has potential as a writer. There was an angst and level of emotion to the story that made me feel more like I was reading a memoir rather than something fictitious. Really, some events and details seemed so specific that I wasn't totally sure this is fiction. The foster brother - sister forbidden relationship didn't bother me -- I'm here for all the #ForbiddenRomance and normally enjoy fake-incest erotica (erotica with stepsiblings or stepparent/child). I was hoping for more of a romance, but I didn't realize this was a retelling of Wuthering Heights, which means drama and madness galore. I also really liked the characters of Karmin and Keegan. Dylan, to me, was too much of the YA antihero -- flawed, tragic, but somehow teen-girl catnip and, at moments, too unrealistic...like a romance novel hero. Cue meeting each other at the bathroom door, wrapped in towels~! I believe there might have been issues with tone and flow of the language. Later in the book, when Emma has grown more comfortable with speaking up and interacting with people, she occasionally goes on rants that sound fervent and natural, unlike the weirdly stiff parts. The book is overly fixated on showers (mentioned 30 times). Can we talk about this? It's unbelievable how frequently Emma thinks about showers, especially at strange times. For example, when she lies down on the grass ("But we already showered, doesn't this defeat the purpose?") and when Dylan suggests that they finger-paint their canvases ("But I just took a shower!"). It makes me wonder how she's able to get through a normal day in her life. No wonder she was so insistent on taking a shower before going to school, even when her shower drain was clogged. The perfectly normal concept of skipping one day must be revolting to her. Aside from her apparent love of showers, Brownlee commits the classic amateur error of including too many mundane details and mentions of unimportant actions. Other fixations include Emma's guilt over graduating early and maybe going to college out of state, and her dad's pushy, competitive streak. The weakest point of this novel is the writing and the plotting. Emma's "voice" is stiff and unnatural. She doesn't sound her age, even though she's supposed to be valedictorian. I took AP and Honors classes in high school, too, and I didn't sound like an adult at all. But meeting Dylan reduces the poor girl to a lovesick puddle in her Dear Catherine journal -- I guess it happens to the best of us? She turns from being a sensible (if dull) goal-driven young woman into a starry-eyed infatuated (and horny) teenage girl. Switching between these two voices was jarring and unlikely (shouldn't her journal entries sound just like her normal voice if the book is written in first person?). It's hard to say which part was worse. Plotwise, so many incidents were contrived, such as Dylan's sophomore English class getting merged with Emma's AP English class so conversations about Wuthering Heights could occur. - Has Emma already read Wuthering Heights? I can't remember if it was mentioned. Her class takes an incredibly long time to finish the book (a full semester, it seems), and at one point in the book, when Emma is still in the early chapters of reading the book for her AP English class, she writes in her Dear Catherine journal that she hopes her romance with Dylan's ends up the same way as however Wuthering Heights resolves. So I would guess she doesn't know the ending, but assumes that it's something good? - I don't recall much about Wuthering Heights because I read it almost 20 years ago. Was Heathcliff abusive? For some reason, not enough attention is drawn to the fact that Dylan is emotionally abusive to Emma. He appears to have inherited bipolar traits from his father -- surely his mood swings, jealousy, and violence can't just be the effect of the medication he's on. He has Emma walking on eggshells, doubting her own agency and making decisions about her future, and actually scaring her by being Jekyll and Hyde on alternate days. I wasn't expecting an abuse plotline, but it's important to call it out so readers can recognize emotional abuse when they see it.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    This is possibly the most gorgeous cover out there right now. But ... all the meta-ness and re-telling-ness of Wuthering Heights (including the awkward journal entries to Catherine as Emma's "rock" through the entire book) this was just hella strange. Wuthering Heights is one of those books that gets romanticized like Romeo and Juliet. The eternal love of Healthcliff and Catherine (who may have classically and appropriately loved each other at some point but ...) and separated by their social cla This is possibly the most gorgeous cover out there right now. But ... all the meta-ness and re-telling-ness of Wuthering Heights (including the awkward journal entries to Catherine as Emma's "rock" through the entire book) this was just hella strange. Wuthering Heights is one of those books that gets romanticized like Romeo and Juliet. The eternal love of Healthcliff and Catherine (who may have classically and appropriately loved each other at some point but ...) and separated by their social class etcetera and so forth on ... but it's not a romance story. It's a tragic tale filled with woe and hateful people doing hateful things to each other under the guise of love (real, experienced, or forbidden). So then to attempt to reimagine it as a YA first-love romance with any type of hopeful ending is an awkward and forced fit. This is circ'ing well at the library because of the cover. I am fairly certain that NONE of the teens who are taking this title out at my library have ever attempted to read (never mind read) Wuthering Heights. So a lot of the allusion and the retelling similarities will be lost on them.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Books and Guacamole

    What a fascinating concept and take on Wuthering Heights! Emma’s a straight-A student but unsure of who she really is. Her world’s thrown crooked when instead of bringing home the young foster child Emma expected, her parents return home with Dylan, who’s Emma’s age, and to whom she feels an inescapable attraction—though they both know if anything romantic is discovered between them, he’ll lose his chance of being adopted. From this high-stakes premise, things quickly intensify, with unexpected What a fascinating concept and take on Wuthering Heights! Emma’s a straight-A student but unsure of who she really is. Her world’s thrown crooked when instead of bringing home the young foster child Emma expected, her parents return home with Dylan, who’s Emma’s age, and to whom she feels an inescapable attraction—though they both know if anything romantic is discovered between them, he’ll lose his chance of being adopted. From this high-stakes premise, things quickly intensify, with unexpected family drama coming to a head and an absolutely charming new love interest complicating Emma’s relationship with Dylan. The novel weaves in reference to Wuthering Heights, which Emma’s reading in AP English—it’s not a strict retelling, instead leaving room for Emma’s own analyses of the parallels to her life. Withering Heights fans, this is an intriguing rework of a classic!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Averie Allwein

    When I read the synopsis of this book I was super excited because I love Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte so much and I have yet to read a retelling of it. I was also initially hooked because I love forbidden romances and wanted to see what happened between the two main characters. But I have to say I was quite disappointed. I ended up getting halfway through this and wanting to DNF it. This was VERY over dramatic and I found myself constantly saying “what the heck?!” There just many things on When I read the synopsis of this book I was super excited because I love Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte so much and I have yet to read a retelling of it. I was also initially hooked because I love forbidden romances and wanted to see what happened between the two main characters. But I have to say I was quite disappointed. I ended up getting halfway through this and wanting to DNF it. This was VERY over dramatic and I found myself constantly saying “what the heck?!” There just many things on this book that was just too weird or abnormal. I found this book somewhat interesting and promising up until the point Emma and Dylan met. After reading the first conversation I was just like, okay that’s not how a situation like that would go like and I just had this bitter feeling ever since that scene. I was not a fan of Emma. At the beginning she claims that she’s a people pleaser, but through the whole book she’s constantly worrying about herself or her own relationship. So consider this a DNF, since I only read up to half way and then just quickly skimmed and read the end. So I can’t give a 100% REVIEW in this book since I didn’t read the entire thing, but I still have this feeling toward this book, I feel that this could have been way better in my honest opinion.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shaine H.

    Emma is intelligent, competitive and talented. She’s on top of her class and at senior high though she’s only 16. Emma dislikes the idea of having a foster brother or sister because she knows she’ll be jealous and she’ll lose her parents attention. Further, her biological brother Matt is excited to have another sibling. And they met, Dylan, Emma and Matt’s foster-brother and around Emma’s age. Dylan has a very tragic story that led him to live in foster care. He use art to express himself and to Emma is intelligent, competitive and talented. She’s on top of her class and at senior high though she’s only 16. Emma dislikes the idea of having a foster brother or sister because she knows she’ll be jealous and she’ll lose her parents attention. Further, her biological brother Matt is excited to have another sibling. And they met, Dylan, Emma and Matt’s foster-brother and around Emma’s age. Dylan has a very tragic story that led him to live in foster care. He use art to express himself and to let go some of his feelings. Also, he goes to school with Emma and had become classmates in one subject. And an intimacy developed between Emma and Dylan. But there are things that hinders their relationship. Read full review: https://wandererinneverland.wordpress...

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kit Frick

    Debut author Tiffany Brownlee takes on quintessential tormented duo Catherine and Heathcliff in WRONG IN ALL THE RIGHT WAYS, a young adult retelling of the Brontë classic. A must-read for anyone seeking a swoony YA romance with plenty of obsession, darkness and brooding, complex characters who make big mistakes, and a nuanced exploration of a knotty ethical dilemma.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Gia Cribbs

    What a great take on Wuthering Heights! If you like your romances forbidden, complicated, and swoony, you need to read this book!

  21. 3 out of 5

    Eden

    DNF @ 37% Can I count this book as read on goodreads even though I only read 1/3 of it? Heck yes I can because it’s my life and I do what I want. When I saw this book on Netgalley, I was excited. A Wuthering Heights reimagining? Heck yes. I loved Wuthering Heights when I read it at the end of last year, and was excited to see a different take on the classically tragic story. Now I’ve read adaptations of classics before. Jane by April Lindner is an excellent example of a classic turned modern retel DNF @ 37% Can I count this book as read on goodreads even though I only read 1/3 of it? Heck yes I can because it’s my life and I do what I want. When I saw this book on Netgalley, I was excited. A Wuthering Heights reimagining? Heck yes. I loved Wuthering Heights when I read it at the end of last year, and was excited to see a different take on the classically tragic story. Now I’ve read adaptations of classics before. Jane by April Lindner is an excellent example of a classic turned modern retelling. Is it the best book in the world? No. But it does the classic justice while also giving me some trashy romance to love. So I went into this book with totally realistic expectations. I wasn’t expecting it to blow me away, but I was expecting to like it for what it was. Boy was I wrong. The dialogue was ridiculously stilted. Sometimes we would change scenes within a chapter without any break or indication that it was happening. Kisses would come COMPLETELY out of nowhere. The main character has no redeemable qualities. Originally, she portrays herself as a plain Jane, easily forgettable type of girl. This assessment is backed up by the fact that she doesn’t have any friends and has never dated anyone: forgettable. However, as soon as the foster brother/love interest character, Dylan, comes into play, we learn that she’s extremely gorgeous. In fact, other female characters back up this fact. Why give us the false representation of her in the first place? Is this supposed to help us feel a camaraderie with her? Because it doesn’t. I get that this is a reimagining of Wuthering Heights, but don’t make the dang love interest her foster brother. In Wuthering Heights, at least as far as I perceived it, the main roadblock to Heathcliff and Catherine’s relationship is the social standing. Foster brother/sister situations back then were extremely different than they are now. He’s basically a glorified hired hand in Wuthering Heights than anything else. Make him the pool boy or something. The “sibling love” relationship trope needs to be OVER. Now let’s dig in to this foster situation. Emma knows she’s going to be receiving a foster brother/sister. She assumes he/she will be younger to match in age with her younger brother. Before the potential sibling arrives, she’s already jealous of the attention they will be taking off of her from her parents (even though she blatantly disregards both of her parents’ affection for her throughout the book). When she sees it’s a boy her age, she flips immediately. She has a crush on him from the very first second. But then she also doesn’t understand why he won’t call her parents mom and dad. WHY would you want a guy you have a crush on to call your parents mom and dad? And why would he be expected to? He is a 16 year old foster kid and he just met all of you! The fact that she and her parents were bothered by him calling them by their first names/surname BOGGLES MY MIND. Not only that, but Emma and her family are under the impression they will be adopting Dylan when he seems to have no idea about that happening. Sorry that I’m ranting but this book really gets my blood boiling. Beyond the fact that they’re foster siblings, Emma doesn’t care that their potential relationship could ruin Dylan’s prospects for a happy family life. She doesn’t even consider his side of things in any scenario. The first night he’s in her home, she interrogates him about his home life and is offended when he doesn’t trust her with the “secrets in his eyes” or some crap like that. I can deal with dislikable MC’s if it is shown that they will grow and evolve. I saw no indications of that happening within the 37% I read of this book. The family relationships and dynamic were weird. Not just between Dylan and Emma, but between the parents and younger brother as well. I didn’t root for their relationship, even thought it was implied that I’m supposed to. Honestly, I DNFed this book for all the very valid reasons listed above, but also because I’m sure (based on how fast their relationship was moving) that there are going to be some very awkward sexual encounters between them, and I just would not be able to deal with that should they occur. I received this book as an arc from Netgalley for my honest opinion. I wanted to like it, but I didn’t. There you go.

  22. 3 out of 5

    Mischa Thrace

    Tiffany Brownlee's retelling of Wuthering Heights opens with one of the best character introductions I've ever read and then gets even better. If you like your romance as complicated as it is swoony, you'll adore this one!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Super

    Like its source material (Wuthering Heights), Wrong in All the Right Ways has a great title, a tumultuous romance, and devastating consequences. If you’re in the mood for a brooding love story, this one’s for you.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Julia Rubin

    A YA re-telling of WUTHERING HEIGHTS? Yes please. Tiffany Brownlee's debut is everything you'd want it to be: intense, romantic, funny, and full of surprises. Go check it out.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Teenreadsdotcom

    Falling in love with her foster brother seems forbidden, yet Emma Ellenburg cannot control her feelings for Dylan McAndrews. When Emma’s parents bring home the dreamy Dylan to live with the Ellenburg family, an idealistic Emma begins a romance with the troubled teen her parents may soon adopt. Inspired by the classic WUTHERING HEIGHTS, author Tiffany Brownlee gives young adult readers an old-fashioned love story with contemporary characters who reflect today’s conflicts. WRONG IN ALL THE RIGHT W Falling in love with her foster brother seems forbidden, yet Emma Ellenburg cannot control her feelings for Dylan McAndrews. When Emma’s parents bring home the dreamy Dylan to live with the Ellenburg family, an idealistic Emma begins a romance with the troubled teen her parents may soon adopt. Inspired by the classic WUTHERING HEIGHTS, author Tiffany Brownlee gives young adult readers an old-fashioned love story with contemporary characters who reflect today’s conflicts. WRONG IN ALL THE RIGHT WAYS makes you think about following your heart even at the expense of others. Brilliant Emma Ellenburg wants to follow her heart. The pretty blonde admits, “I want to fall in love. Who doesn’t?...Somewhere between the first kiss and falling in love, life happens. Messy entanglements ensue, summer flings and, hearts break…but if it means I find the other half of my heart in the end, I think it’s worth it.” The novel, which is narrated by Emma, is so compelling because the high school senior shares her innermost thoughts and feelings. Readers will especially enjoy her journal entries that she keeps for English class. Her class is reading WUTHERING HEIGHTS --- known for its “famous lusty foster siblings.” Fittingly, Emma writes to Catherine Earnshaw, the book’s protagonist. If Emma sees herself in Catherine, then Dylan must be Heathcliff, the orphan brought into the Earnshaw family. The traumatized Dylan, who resembles “pre-Miley Liam Hemsworth,” was placed in foster care because his father shot and killed his mom. The artsy Dylan struggles with academics while Emma (who skipped two years of school) shines at the top of her class. Erudite Emma hides behind her glasses and considers herself a “plain Jane,” but the instantly popular Dylan is captivated by his foster sister’s beauty. Just as Catherine finds herself in love with Heathcliff, Emma falls hard for Dylan. The story’s parallels to WUTHERING HEIGHTS reinforce its timeless themes of love and what relationships are acceptable to society. Afraid their relationship might jeopardize Dylan’s adoption, Dylan and Emma secretly date --- romancing in the sunny setting of Southern California. Most of the story unfolds at the sprawling Ellenburg home where the teens meet in the pool house (Emma’s new room) or Dylan’s art studio. The family also keeps a vacation house at the exquisite Lake Arrowhead where the Ellenburg’s bring Dylan for fall break. I enjoyed following Emma’s lavish lifestyle, and I would have loved even more detail. What town do they actually reside in? Where is Cedar Pointe High? Cedar Pointe High connects young adult readers to Brownlee’s characters. Everyone can relate to the social groups in a high school. Emma considers herself a “nobody” until “pretty, popular, perfect” Karmin Ortega invites her to try out for the dance team. Making the dance team and befriending Karmin elevates Emma’s social status and attracts the attention of Keegan, Karmin’s twin brother. Emma begins to date Keegan and use him as a “decoy” so no one suspects her involvement with Dylan. This love triangle kept me turning the pages of WRONG IN ALL THE RIGHT WAYS. Author Tiffany Brownlee gives young audiences a refreshing romance with a clever connection to a classic. Emma and Dylan are unforgettable characters who remind audiences of the pain and pleasure of falling in love. WRONG IN ALL THE RIGHT WAYS is the right pick for your summer reading list. Reviewed by Juliette G., Teen Board Member

  26. 3 out of 5

    Laura Jones

    Brownlee's debut novel, a modern-day re-imagining of Bronte's classic, Wuthering Heights, will have readers swooning over the forbidden romance and the tension between main characters Emma and Dylan. Skipping two grades in high school, exceptionally smart 16 year old Emma is in her senior year at the top of her class. Emma is pretty much a loner, focusing all of her time and energy on studying, with the hope of getting away from Cedar Pointe to pursue a career in the publishing industry. An added Brownlee's debut novel, a modern-day re-imagining of Bronte's classic, Wuthering Heights, will have readers swooning over the forbidden romance and the tension between main characters Emma and Dylan. Skipping two grades in high school, exceptionally smart 16 year old Emma is in her senior year at the top of her class. Emma is pretty much a loner, focusing all of her time and energy on studying, with the hope of getting away from Cedar Pointe to pursue a career in the publishing industry. An added bonus for going away to college in less than a year is that she'll be out from under the roof of her overbearing, controlling father, a former baseball star who makes everything Emma does into a fiercely competitive endeavor. Thrown for a loop by her parents, Emma is told that she is getting a foster sibling. Her little brother, Matthew, age 8, is excited, hoping to have a playmate. Emma, on the other hand, is concerned about losing more attention from her parents the last year she will be under their roof. Thinking she'll get another kid brother or sister like Matthew, Emma is surprised to get Dylan, a very handsome, mysterious boy her age as the new foster sibling. Dylan is an artist and very talented, but his painful past has taken its toll on him, as he tries to keep things hidden and puts on a happy face around Emma's parents and people at school. In the midst of receiving a new foster sibling into her family, things start looking up a bit for Emma when Karmin, the hot, popular girl encourages her to join the dance team and befriends her. Emma and Dylan first try to deny their immediate attraction to one another, but it soon becomes impossible. Knowing they are breaking a cardinal rule of foster care, even though they are in no way blood-related, they have to keep their attraction a secret, causing them to long for the small bits of alone time they get with one another. As with all forbidden romance, there are some bumps in the road, the first being star baseball player, Keegan, Karmin's twin brother, who is attracted to Emma. Keegan is undeniably cute, kind, and everything Emma's parents want her to have in a boyfriend. Plus, the baseball thing is a major hit with her father. However, Emma only wants what she really can't have - Dylan. As Emma and Dylan fall harder for each other, the stress and worry of trying to hide and uncertainty of the future with Emma going away to college proves to be too much. When tragedy strikes, Emma is forced to reveal her secrets to try to heal the sudden loss of so many firsts - her first kiss, first relationship, and first love. The ending is hopeful, with just enough uncertainty to keep readers guessing what will be in store next for Emma and Dylan. You'll have to read it to find out for yourselves. I'm not in the business of spoiling endings! Wrong in All the Right Ways is well-written with many connections to the well-known love triangle of Catherine, Heathcliff, and Edgar of Wuthering Heights. I can't wait to read Tiffany's next novel because I loved this one! I would recommend it for teens and also adults who enjoy quality YA literature.

  27. 3 out of 5

    Erica Mae Campos

    Review originally posted at my blog: https://livingahundredlives.wordpress... I was so excited to start this one, I really did not know what to expect. I haven't read Wuthering Heights before and know, I'm intrigued by the story. I believe this might be a great read for fans of that book. So the book started off with introducing Emma, the almost-perfect girl. I mean, she really is except for her social skills. Emma has great grades, applying to prestigious universities for college, knows some spor Review originally posted at my blog: https://livingahundredlives.wordpress... I was so excited to start this one, I really did not know what to expect. I haven't read Wuthering Heights before and know, I'm intrigued by the story. I believe this might be a great read for fans of that book. So the book started off with introducing Emma, the almost-perfect girl. I mean, she really is except for her social skills. Emma has great grades, applying to prestigious universities for college, knows some sports and she even got to the dance team! That's a nice life to trade for until her parents decide to adopt a "boy" and came home with a teenager the same age as her. Well, surprise surprise. Dylan is a painter. He really is an artist and he gets along with Emma's family well. Although, he's got a dark past and kept his feelings bottled up. But he's really nice and helpful to everyone around him. I honestly thought there'd be a hate-love relationship between the two of them like they'd first start fighting before they become close. I actually really don't know what to think of their budding romance. But hey, no hate. The only thing I don't like in these kind of things are love triangles. I reallyyyy hate love triangles because well, they frustrate me! Especially when the girl or the guy likes both of them. Enough of my rambling, of course I should've expected a love triangle here. I admit I actually wanted Keegan more for Emma to avoid complications, lol. And to be honest, watching Emma and Dylan is really hmmm, frustrating? Lol. Or am I not just used to reading bickering couples in books? Though there was a time that I really wanted to slap Dylan. What's great is the characters developed. They grew up. The second half (or maybe that was the final quarter) of the the book gave me the peace I wanted with the book. It was  nice to see them just reflecting. And plus points for not making this about just romance. I loved the part wherein the whole family was involved and they finally said what they have to.  The final chapters are really nice. The family became stronger than ever and please don't get me to spoil the ending for you because it was really lovely and I think there's no other way to make it better. This book actually made me feel a lot of emotions and there's this feeling of contentment upon finishing it. Overall, I rate Wrong in All the Right Ways by Tiffany Brownlee, 3 out of 5 stars!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Paige Green

    Disclaimer: I received a free copy of this book from the author. Thanks! All opinions are my own. Rating: 3/5 Publication Date: July 17, 2018 Genre: YA Contemporary Recommended Age: 13+ (some mature scenes, questionable relationships that might be somewhat immoral) Pages: 352 Author Website Amazon Link Synopsis: Emma’s life has always gone according to her very careful plans. But things take a turn toward the unexpected when she falls in love for the first time with the one person in the world who’s of Disclaimer: I received a free copy of this book from the author. Thanks! All opinions are my own. Rating: 3/5 Publication Date: July 17, 2018 Genre: YA Contemporary Recommended Age: 13+ (some mature scenes, questionable relationships that might be somewhat immoral) Pages: 352 Author Website Amazon Link Synopsis: Emma’s life has always gone according to her very careful plans. But things take a turn toward the unexpected when she falls in love for the first time with the one person in the world who’s off-limits: her new foster brother, the gorgeous and tormented Dylan McAndrews. Meanwhile, Emma’s AP English class is reading Wuthering Heights, and she’s been assigned to echo Emily Bronte’s style in an epistolary format. With irrepressible feelings and no one to confide in, she’s got a lot to write about. Distraught by the escalating intensity of their mutual attraction, Emma and Dylan try to constrain their romance to the page―for fear of threatening Dylan’s chances at being adopted into a loving home. But the strength of first love is all-consuming, and they soon get enveloped in a passionate, secretive relationship with a very uncertain outcome. Tiffany Brownlee's Wrong in All the Right Ways marks the exciting debut of a fresh voice in contemporary teen fiction. I’d never read Wuthering Heights, but I decided I could read this book without reading the classic. Maybe I was wrong in the end? Who knows. Anyways, I loved the writing of the book and I thought that for the most part the characters were really well developed. I also felt the pacing was really well done. However, I do feel that the book has some flaws for my own reading. I felt that there was too much instalove and the relationship between Emma and Dylan gave me the creeps. I felt that Dylan and Emma were too cliché and I did not enjoy the male objectification at all. The ending was confusing and it felt like too much was happening. I also didn’t really enjoy the plot twist, but that’s just my opinion. Verdict: If you like Wuthering Heights, you might like this one!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

    Thank you @kidlitexchange for the review copy of this book. All opinions are my own. This young adult, contemporary romance was just what I needed after reading some heavier books lately. It was easy to get lost in the storyline and drama making me eager to see just how everything was going to work out amongst the characters. Emma is starting her senior year of high school and is set on remaining in the shadows as she focuses on her AP credits and plans for college applications. Those plans are Thank you @kidlitexchange for the review copy of this book. All opinions are my own. This young adult, contemporary romance was just what I needed after reading some heavier books lately. It was easy to get lost in the storyline and drama making me eager to see just how everything was going to work out amongst the characters. Emma is starting her senior year of high school and is set on remaining in the shadows as she focuses on her AP credits and plans for college applications. Those plans are completely thrown for a loop when her parents decide to foster a boy her age. A cute boy that is named Dylan. She is completely surprised when she starts having feelings for him and he seems to like her back. The two enter a secret relationship that’s full of many twists, self discoveries and plenty of secrets. This a modern retelling of Wurthering Heights. Don’t worry if you haven’t read the original Emily Bronte classic, the author does a fantastic job of weaving both to help guide the reader through the similarities. (Emma is reading the classic in one of her classes and even writes journal entries to Catherine Earnshaw). There was a lot going on amongst these characters, as you can imagine. They obviously endure a secret relationship, but it also tackles foster care, an incarcerated parent, unstable emotions, pressure to succeed, pushy parents, drug abuse, therapy and a car accident that finally wakes everyone up when a main character is seriously injured. I like that it also showcased the importance of having good friends at that age and not forgetting to enjoy the journey before you start college and become an adult. Emma definitley goes through some major character growth over the course of her experiences. A great coming of age story that will surely capture your attention. Would make a wonderful companion read if you are studying the classic or enjoy retellings. This was the author’s debut novel!!

  30. 3 out of 5

    Barbara

    As most of us know, relationships are complicated, but when sibling love and romantic love get mixed together, they can become even messier. In this novel, inspired by Wuthering Heights but without all the wuthering, sixteen-year-old Emma Ellenburg proves that the heart sometimes makes decisions that the brain knows aren't necessarily the smartest moves. She might be the smartest student in her senior class, but she has little experience with romance. When her parents decide to foster and possib As most of us know, relationships are complicated, but when sibling love and romantic love get mixed together, they can become even messier. In this novel, inspired by Wuthering Heights but without all the wuthering, sixteen-year-old Emma Ellenburg proves that the heart sometimes makes decisions that the brain knows aren't necessarily the smartest moves. She might be the smartest student in her senior class, but she has little experience with romance. When her parents decide to foster and possibly eventually adopt Dylan McAndrews, she falls head over heels in love with him, and he loves her back. Because they worry that their relationship could cause problems for the adoption and Dylan could be sent somewhere else, they keep everything hidden, and Emma even begins a relationship with the twin brother of her dance team friend. Dylan has a painful past, and sometimes seems given to bouts of anger and moodiness. After he's injured in a car accident, Emma must decide what to do about her own future. Romantics may love the ending, but I felt more than a little bit uneasy, given that Dylan has had issues with drugs and anger management previously. I don't really know how this could have a happy ending, and as smart as Emma was supposed to be, surely she can see the writing on the wall, especially given that she's reading Wuthering Heights for her English class. And as a side note, her class surely took a long, long time to get through that book. For a valedictorian, she made me worry about several of her choices. In the end, this one was promising, but it didn't quite deliver the punch I expected it to, and there were some odd remarks about her feelings about her father's competitiveness that cropped up near the end of the book and hadn't been particularly evident earlier on. I suppose we've all been involved with someone who was wrong for us in all the right ways--clever title, that--but not quite to this point. This one will undoubtedly prompt some conversations.

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