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Stay Hidden

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A woman has been shot to death by a deer hunter on an island off the coast of Maine. To newly promoted Warden Investigator Mike Bowditch, the case seems open and shut. But as soon as he arrives on remote Maquoit Island he discovers mysteries piling up one on top of the other. The hunter now claims he didn’t fire the fatal shot and the evidence proves he’s telling the truth. A woman has been shot to death by a deer hunter on an island off the coast of Maine. To newly promoted Warden Investigator Mike Bowditch, the case seems open and shut. But as soon as he arrives on remote Maquoit Island he discovers mysteries piling up one on top of the other. The hunter now claims he didn’t fire the fatal shot and the evidence proves he’s telling the truth. Bowditch begins to suspect the secretive community might be covering up the identity of whoever killed the woman, known as Ariel Evans. The controversial author was supposedly writing a book about the island's notorious hermit. So why are there no notes in her rented cottage? The biggest blow comes the next day when the weekly ferry arrives and off steps the dead woman herself. Ariel Evans is alive, well, and determined to solve her own “murder” even if it upsets Mike Bowditch’s investigation and makes them both targets of an elusive killer who will do anything to conceal his crimes.


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A woman has been shot to death by a deer hunter on an island off the coast of Maine. To newly promoted Warden Investigator Mike Bowditch, the case seems open and shut. But as soon as he arrives on remote Maquoit Island he discovers mysteries piling up one on top of the other. The hunter now claims he didn’t fire the fatal shot and the evidence proves he’s telling the truth. A woman has been shot to death by a deer hunter on an island off the coast of Maine. To newly promoted Warden Investigator Mike Bowditch, the case seems open and shut. But as soon as he arrives on remote Maquoit Island he discovers mysteries piling up one on top of the other. The hunter now claims he didn’t fire the fatal shot and the evidence proves he’s telling the truth. Bowditch begins to suspect the secretive community might be covering up the identity of whoever killed the woman, known as Ariel Evans. The controversial author was supposedly writing a book about the island's notorious hermit. So why are there no notes in her rented cottage? The biggest blow comes the next day when the weekly ferry arrives and off steps the dead woman herself. Ariel Evans is alive, well, and determined to solve her own “murder” even if it upsets Mike Bowditch’s investigation and makes them both targets of an elusive killer who will do anything to conceal his crimes.

30 review for Stay Hidden

  1. 5 out of 5

    Debra

    Mike Bowditch has been newly appointed as Warden Investigator when the call comes in that a woman has been shot to death in a hunting "incident" on Marquoit Island off the coast of Maine. The dead woman is the controversial Author, Ariel Winters. She was believed to have been staying on the island to interview another controversial person on the island - a once Hollywood insider who now lives like a hermit with his sheep. Initially the case appears cut and dry. Apparently, a hunter mistook the w Mike Bowditch has been newly appointed as Warden Investigator when the call comes in that a woman has been shot to death in a hunting "incident" on Marquoit Island off the coast of Maine. The dead woman is the controversial Author, Ariel Winters. She was believed to have been staying on the island to interview another controversial person on the island - a once Hollywood insider who now lives like a hermit with his sheep. Initially the case appears cut and dry. Apparently, a hunter mistook the woman, who was hanging laundry, for a white-tailed deer. But later claims he did not shoot her. Ballistic testing shows he is telling the truth. So, if he didn't shoot the woman who did? To further complicate the investigation, Ariel Winters steps off a boat the next day and sends the entire island into shock. If Ariel Winters is alive, who is the dead woman? Not only is Ariel Winters alive, she is also determined to identify the shooter who killed "her". The island is a tight knit community of lobster fishermen and their families who take care of their own. They don't like outsiders poking into their business and aren't too friendly or forthcoming with information. Those in the community have lived there all their lives and have their own way of dealing with things. Bowditch holds his own even when there are those who questions his ability to solve this case. He is up against lies, secrets, deception, mistrust and that dang fog that lingers everywhere not to mention the ticks and overabundance of deer. This was a fast read for me. There is not a huge amount of action in this book but there is the quest to find the killer. This book is a quiet page turner. I had to keep reading to learn the how and why of this case. I had several theories along the way but ultimately it was Bowditch and not me who solved this case! The island is full of some interesting characters and I was intrigued by the creepy notes left for Bowditch by his "host/hotel" managers. This book is atmospheric, and I could almost see the fog hoovering and lingering over the coast and in the forest. It adds to the story and feeling of gloom on the island. It provides the perfect cover for those up to no good to hide and even possibly get away with murder. Well written and intriguing, stay hidden does not disappoint. This book is also #9 in the series but worked extremely well as a stand alone book for me. I received a copy of this book from St. Martin's Press and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. See more of my reviews at www.openbookpost.com

  2. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    Like the flick of a white-tailed deer, you may be in range of the receiving end of a bullet. Hunting season and all, you know..... Was it a careless accident of bad judgment and circumstances or was the unfortunate victim an actual victim? Mike Bowditch, newly sporting the credentials of Maine Warden Investigator, is called out to Maquoit Island off the coast of Maine. Maquoit is the foggiest place on the Atlantic seaboard with that same dense fog having a highly corrosive effect on both metal and Like the flick of a white-tailed deer, you may be in range of the receiving end of a bullet. Hunting season and all, you know..... Was it a careless accident of bad judgment and circumstances or was the unfortunate victim an actual victim? Mike Bowditch, newly sporting the credentials of Maine Warden Investigator, is called out to Maquoit Island off the coast of Maine. Maquoit is the foggiest place on the Atlantic seaboard with that same dense fog having a highly corrosive effect on both metal and on its people. Residents here are set in their ways with generations claiming the land and the sea air as their own. A young woman from Manhattan has rented a cabin during the off season to write about the local hermit, Blake Markman, who lives on Stormalong Island surrounded by his sheep and the wildness of his existence. But she doesn't get too far in her research when she is found dead while hanging up laundry on the back clothesline. Perhaps this woman will have her own story clipped to an endless line of events in the making. Bowditch flies to the island with Charlie Stevens, an ace Cessna pilot and friend. On board are Maine State Police investigator, Steven Klesko, and Warden Ronette Landry. Rutted roads and lack of transportation come into play. Stevens, Klesko, and Landry must get back to the mainland before a torrential rainstorm hits. Orders given, Bowditch is left to his own means on the island. Paul Doiron creates a far different and challenging setting for this ninth edition in the series. Bowditch is usually up to his elbows in the dense Maine woods surrounded by familiar landscape. This time Bowditch is shook out into very deep waters with commercial fisherman, stoggy residents, decrepit surroundings, the dark shade of drugs, and a few Neo-Nazis living on the edge in multiple ways. Oh, and did I mention a possible murder in the mix? Doiron is known for his snappy dialogue and cutting retorts. He does a stellar job of honing his characters in the light of island living. This is an upward battle for Bowditch as he meets head-on with the locals while trying to get a foothold in his ever-mounting investigation. Bowditch has a lot to prove here with his superiors breathing down his neck and the high threshold that he continuously sets out for himself. Smart, atmospheric, and an electrically charged zig zag of a storyline, Stay Hidden is another hit for the talented Paul Doiron. It can be read as a standalone as well. But you may just want to check out the beginning books of this series to see what all the buzz is about. Bravo, once again, to Paul Doiron. Can't wait for the next one.

  3. 3 out of 5

    Paul

    I hope you enjoy reading it as much as I did writing it.

  4. 3 out of 5

    Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede

    STAY HIDDEN is the ninth book in the Mike Bowditch series and I was thrilled once again step into Mike's world. Now, I have only read two books previously in this series, but I enjoy this series very much. Especially since reading about a game warden is a bit different from the usual police or sheriff novels I usually read. READ THE REST OF THE REVIEW OVER AT FRESH FICTION!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Juli

    I enjoy suspense and thriller novels that deal with murder or crime investigations. I especially enjoy them if they throw something unusual, new or creative into the mix. My newest obsession is crime thrillers with main characters in park ranger or wildlife officer positions. It's breathing a bit of new life into the genre for me, as straight cop/bad guy stories can get old hat after awhile. Stay Hidden is the 9th book in the Mike Bowditch series. This is the first book in this series I've read. I enjoy suspense and thriller novels that deal with murder or crime investigations. I especially enjoy them if they throw something unusual, new or creative into the mix. My newest obsession is crime thrillers with main characters in park ranger or wildlife officer positions. It's breathing a bit of new life into the genre for me, as straight cop/bad guy stories can get old hat after awhile. Stay Hidden is the 9th book in the Mike Bowditch series. This is the first book in this series I've read...and I'm glad I did! The main character is a Game Warden in Maine. Fatal hunting accidents aren't that unusual. People get mistaken for deer or other animals all the time. Mike Bowditch even remembers a case of a lady getting shot because a hunter mistook her white gloves for the white tail of a running deer. But this time.....the shooting death of a controversial author.....the death is a bit more than just a hunting accident. The case soon turns into something much more serious....and dangerous. I loved this book! The story had so many surprises and twists that the suspense was constant. I love the location and the fact that the main investigator is a wildlife officer. I was able to follow the story just fine even though I haven't read the previous 8 books in this series. But, I could tell that there has been a lot of character and background plot development since the start of the series. Because I enjoyed this book so much, I'm going to backtrack and read the rest of this series. Then portions of this story and the main characters will make more sense. It isn't necessary to have read the other books to enjoy this one, however. Great book! Lots of action and a wonderfully complex and suspenseful plot! I will definitely read more by this author! **I voluntarily read a review copy of this book from St. Martins Press via NetGalley. All opinions expressed are entirely my own.**

  6. 3 out of 5

    Craig Sisterson

    Among a seemingly skyrocketing trend of domestic noir, unreliable narrators, and unlikable characters, Maine author Paul Doiron offers something rather timeless: an engaging series centred on an honourable and interesting detective operating in a distinct and well-evoked setting. STAY HIDDEN is the ninth Mike Bowditch mystery, and it sees the Maine game warden finding his feet in his new role of Warden Investigator. Doiron, who was a longtime magazine editor in Maine and is a keen outdoorsman (f Among a seemingly skyrocketing trend of domestic noir, unreliable narrators, and unlikable characters, Maine author Paul Doiron offers something rather timeless: an engaging series centred on an honourable and interesting detective operating in a distinct and well-evoked setting. STAY HIDDEN is the ninth Mike Bowditch mystery, and it sees the Maine game warden finding his feet in his new role of Warden Investigator. Doiron, who was a longtime magazine editor in Maine and is a keen outdoorsman (fisherman) himself, has a really great touch for the rural and wilderness setting of his home state. This is not your fictional Maine of Jessica Fletcher and Murder, She Wrote fame - it is wilder, grittier, filled with more struggle among some spectacular scenery. Bowditch is flown to remote Maquoit Island off the Maine coast following the fatal shooting of a controversial journalist during hunting season. He's still dealing with debris from a broken relationship, making the journey tougher given his ex's father is also on board. What Bowditch and his superiors first think is an open-and-shut hunting accident turns into anything but, especially when the purported culprit turns out to just be a witness. So a killer is still at large. Things get even more complicated when the dead woman later arrives on the island ferry, planning to interview a notorious hermit who fled his Hollywood lifestyle many years ago following his wife's suspicious death. So who pulled the trigger and killed the victim, and who was the victim? Hemmed in by feuding islanders and a building media furore - not to mention his bosses back on the mainland who are keen for a quick resolution that doesn't create too much hassle - Bowditch struggles to prove himself in his new role, stumbling through the fog, figuratively and literally. This is an intriguing and clever mystery that flows along wonderfully. Throughout the unfolding story, Doiron fashions a really exquisite portrait of isolated communities on the Atlantic seaboard, island towns full of lobstering families and traditions who face many challenges while leading a modern frontier lifestyle. You can feel the salt spray, the ruggedness of the landscapes and the people who populate them. Strong and nuanced characterisation blends with a striking sense of place. This is the first Mike Bowditch mystery I've read, but it certainly won't be the last. Doiron is a great storyteller, and this is astute and multifaceted crime writing. Recommended.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chris Conley

    Oh my. Mike Bowditch seems finally to be coming into his own. I always forget how young he is. His life experience makes him seem so much older...not necessarily wiser. I really enjoy this series.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kevintipple

    The Maine deer hunting season has barely begun as Stay Hidden: A Novel by Paul Doiron begins, and already there are two deaths. The deaths are not are not hunting accidents. The warden service refers to them as what they are--- homicides. The reason a person is dead is because the person, the shooter, maybe both made a mistake that could have and should have been avoided. Out on Maquoit Island, Ariel Evans lies dead in the yard behind the house she was renting. For Mike Bowditch, who was recently The Maine deer hunting season has barely begun as Stay Hidden: A Novel by Paul Doiron begins, and already there are two deaths. The deaths are not are not hunting accidents. The warden service refers to them as what they are--- homicides. The reason a person is dead is because the person, the shooter, maybe both made a mistake that could have and should have been avoided. Out on Maquoit Island, Ariel Evans lies dead in the yard behind the house she was renting. For Mike Bowditch, who was recently promoted to warden investigator four months ago, this is his first hunting homicide case. At least the case should be relatively easy one as the hunter involved has already confessed to firing the shot that killed the woman as she stood hanging laundry in the backyard. According to the constable on the island, the controversial author was hanging white underwear on the clothesline and should have known she could be mistaken for a white tailed deer running away. The flash of white caused by her hanging of her underwear may have so mimicked the movement of a deer tail, the hunter made a fatal mistake. Sent out to the island with Ronette Landry of the warden service and Steve Klesko of the Maine State Police, the trio has plenty of work to do even if the case is as simple as described. Upon arrival on the island they learn the hunter has recounted. There are other problems as well making it very clear this is not the simple open and shut case they had been led to believe before they headed out to the island. For one thing, the controversial author, who recently wrote a book about living undercover with the Nazis in Idaho, is living on the island as part of her research into the island’s notorious hermit. Yet, the cottage she rented contains no evidenced that she is a writer or working on any project. It does contain evidence of her recent partying, something the locals have made clear she is well known among the residents for, as well as other items that do not fit the impression one would expect of her. Then there is the fact the next day the real Ariel Evans arrives on the island determined to find out what her sister was doing and who killed her. Stay Hidden: A Novel by Paul Doiron is a turning point novel for the character of Mike Bowditch. In this mystery, Bowditch has a new job with increased scrutiny and pressure, his long term relationship with Stacy has abruptly ended, and there are other issues. He is a man with a lot of pressure, conflicted feelings about many different things, and very little help or an island where the locals deal with their own issues in their own way and don’t like outsiders. Especially law enforcement types. The latest book in the series that began with The Poacher’s Son is another good one. Stay Hidden: A Novel is a read that, as they all do, quickly pulls the reader into the natural beauty of the Maine landscape. Things are always complicated in these books because of Bowditch’s past as well as the complicated characters in both minor and major roles. Nobody in this series is a generic placeholder character. Then there are the actual mysteries themselves to solve. A series that can only be fully appreciated if read in order, Stay Hidden: A Novel is another very good installment. Stay Hidden: A Novel Paul Doiron http://www.pauldoiron.com Center Point Large Print http://www.centerpointlargeprint.com August 2018 ISBN# 978-1-68324-874-3 Large Print Hardback (also available in audio, digital, and print formats) 478 Pages $38.95 Material supplied by the good folks of the Dallas Library System. Kevin R. Tipple ©2018

  9. 4 out of 5

    Frosty61

    This one didn't quite measure up to the Doiron books I've read in the past, but I finished it - albeit much slower than I've finished other books in the series. First, my number one problem with it: it depicts Mainers in a really negative light - the residents of Maquoit Island come across as so secretive and creepy that they reminded me of characters from a few cult novels I've read. None of them is remotely likeable (they hate all outsiders messing with their little community and seem to be c This one didn't quite measure up to the Doiron books I've read in the past, but I finished it - albeit much slower than I've finished other books in the series. First, my number one problem with it: it depicts Mainers in a really negative light - the residents of Maquoit Island come across as so secretive and creepy that they reminded me of characters from a few cult novels I've read. None of them is remotely likeable (they hate all outsiders messing with their little community and seem to be controlled by the powerful harbor master, Harmon). I found I didn't care what happened to any of them. As others have said, there are too many characters, many of whom have similar names (which also confused the proof reader - many typos). Mike Bowditch, Game Warden Investigator, newly promoted and out of his element, botches many aspects of the investigation and alienates himself quickly. I understand that he's new to the job, but it would've been a more engaging if he seemed a LITTLE more confident and didn't seem to just drift here and there trying to talk to all the characters and divine a confession. That said, he does solve the crime in the end and the last scenes on the water finally give us the action that has been lacking in the rest of the book. Descriptions of the rocky coastline, the muted fog, the wildlife all add up to a great sense of the true rustic nature of Maine. I would've liked more depth, less stereotypes, and more action to hold my interest.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    My first book by this author and it won't be the last. Apparently one can read this series out of order as I started with #9. I really enjoyed Mike Bowditch and thought the characters were very "real" which is another reason to continue with the series. The descriptions of the landscape, weather and people in Maine made you feel like you were there with them.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Tiger

    Newly promoted Warden Investigator, Mike Bowditch, is called to remote Maquoit Island when a visiting journalist is shot dead in the backyard of her rental house. He seems to get no support in his investigation from either the locals, who are more than happy to alibi each other, nor from his superiors who seem to take pleasure in their critique of his methods. Stubborn as always, Bowditch rattles enough chains that eventually the truth comes out. A solid series addition.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Harvey

    Excellent new entry in this fine series featuring game warden (now promoted to warden investigator) Mike Bowditch. Author Doiron has added some great twists to this one. This is also different than the previous entries in that it is essentially a traditional "locked room" murder mystery. The "room" is a sparsely-populated island off the coast of Maine. All the residents are, by definition, suspects. Due to circumstances, Bowditch finds himself the lone investigator on the case and must solve it b Excellent new entry in this fine series featuring game warden (now promoted to warden investigator) Mike Bowditch. Author Doiron has added some great twists to this one. This is also different than the previous entries in that it is essentially a traditional "locked room" murder mystery. The "room" is a sparsely-populated island off the coast of Maine. All the residents are, by definition, suspects. Due to circumstances, Bowditch finds himself the lone investigator on the case and must solve it before assistance arrives...to be the hero or the goat. Mike digs in to learn the island's secrets. Doiron always writes well of the outdoor life; this one has wonderful descriptions of life on an island getting ready for winter lobstering season.

  13. 4 out of 5

    The Real Book Spy

    Read this review and more at www.TheRealBookSpy.com In his latest adventure (the ninth of the series), Mike Bowditch adjusts to his new role as an investigator while trying to solve the most head-scratching murder case of his career. No longer a game warden, Bowditch recently accepted a job promotion to become Maine’s newest warden investigator. When readers catch back up with Mike, he’s got a lot more going on than just trying to get used to the shirt and tie his new gig requires him to wear on Read this review and more at www.TheRealBookSpy.com In his latest adventure (the ninth of the series), Mike Bowditch adjusts to his new role as an investigator while trying to solve the most head-scratching murder case of his career. No longer a game warden, Bowditch recently accepted a job promotion to become Maine’s newest warden investigator. When readers catch back up with Mike, he’s got a lot more going on than just trying to get used to the shirt and tie his new gig requires him to wear on a near-daily basis. Recently split from his longtime girlfriend, Stacey, he’s also adjusting to life as a bachelor. It’s only a few days into deer season, and there have already been several reported deaths. First, a grandfather tripped and accidentally shot his grandson in the head. Seeing what he’d done, the old man went into cardiac arrest, leaving the boy’s father alone in the woods and scrambling for help. With resources being poured into that investigation, Mike is assigned the other fatality, where a woman on Maquoit Island, located twenty miles off the coast of Mount Desert, was shot and killed while hanging her wet laundry on the line to dry. Before leading a small team of various members of local law enforcement to the island, Mike was told the case was a slam dunk. A man had apparently confessed to accidentally shooting the woman, whom he’d mistaken for a deer. But, as readers might expect, nothing goes according to plan. Taking a fifteen-minute plane ride in Charly Steven’s Cessna, which is awkward for Bowditch due to the fact that Charly is Stacy’s father and the two haven’t exactly been the best of friends since he split with his daughter. . . Continue reading: https://therealbookspy.com/2018/05/21...

  14. 4 out of 5

    J.R.

    Newly promoted to warden investigator, Mike Bowditch is sent to Maquoit, a remote Maine island, after a woman identified as a controversial journalist is shot and killed in what appears to be a hunting-related incident. Bowditch, who had been a game warden for six years, is a rookie investigator and is, understandably, nervous about this, his first hunting homicide. Adding to his distress is being flown to the island by Charley Stevens, his mentor and old friend from whom he's been estranged sinc Newly promoted to warden investigator, Mike Bowditch is sent to Maquoit, a remote Maine island, after a woman identified as a controversial journalist is shot and killed in what appears to be a hunting-related incident. Bowditch, who had been a game warden for six years, is a rookie investigator and is, understandably, nervous about this, his first hunting homicide. Adding to his distress is being flown to the island by Charley Stevens, his mentor and old friend from whom he's been estranged since breaking up with Charley's daughter. Ariel Evans, the supposed victim of the shooting, had written a book exposing neo-Nazis and had taken a cottage on the island in hope of interviewing for another book a hermit with his own mysterious background. Mike's first surprise on landing is that his impression the shooter had confessed is incorrect. The island's constable had misunderstood information provided in initial reports. A second surprise comes when the real Ariel Evans arrives and identifies the victim as her sister, Miranda, a woman with a history of alcohol and drug abuse. Rather than an unfortunate accident, it soon appears the shooting may have been intentional and Maquoit abounds in suspects. The close-knit islanders aren't inclined to give Mike much help and his digging into their secrets ruffles feathers and may be putting him and the real Ariel in danger. This is the ninth in the Bowditch series and, as usual, Doiron provides an intriguing selection of characters and sense of place. The fogbound island setting of this novel adds to the suspense and tension. If you like something a little different in your mysteries, you'll enjoy Stay Hidden as much as I did.

  15. 5 out of 5

    November Is Nyarlathotep

    Review: STAY HIDDEN by Paul Doiron (Mike Bowditch #9) Newly appointed as a Warden Investigator, Maine Game Warden is assigned to his first hunting death incident, on an isolated Atlantic island. Mike doesn't exactly acquit himself with glory, though in his defense, this is his first investigation and the islanders are both aloof and secretive. A vacationing woman is shot while hanging laundry, supposedly a hunting accident. Danger and revelation abound, but still Mike perseveres to ultimate discov Review: STAY HIDDEN by Paul Doiron (Mike Bowditch #9) Newly appointed as a Warden Investigator, Maine Game Warden is assigned to his first hunting death incident, on an isolated Atlantic island. Mike doesn't exactly acquit himself with glory, though in his defense, this is his first investigation and the islanders are both aloof and secretive. A vacationing woman is shot while hanging laundry, supposedly a hunting accident. Danger and revelation abound, but still Mike perseveres to ultimate discovery.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    This is the ninth book in Doiron’s crime series featuring Maine former game warden and now newly promoted warden investigator Mike Bowditch. (In Maine, game wardens are full law-enforcement officers, with all the powers of state troopers: “They are the ‘off-road police.’” Warden investigators are “for all intents and purposes a plainclothes detective.”) Mike has been a game warden for six years but a warden investigator for only four months when he is assigned his first hunting homicide. The wom This is the ninth book in Doiron’s crime series featuring Maine former game warden and now newly promoted warden investigator Mike Bowditch. (In Maine, game wardens are full law-enforcement officers, with all the powers of state troopers: “They are the ‘off-road police.’” Warden investigators are “for all intents and purposes a plainclothes detective.”) Mike has been a game warden for six years but a warden investigator for only four months when he is assigned his first hunting homicide. The woman killed, Ariel Evans, 37, was a famous journalist from Manhattan renting a house on the [fictional] island of Maquoit off the coast of Maine, possibly to work on another exposé. Her previous book had been a best-selling exposé of neo-Nazis, of which there were a few in Maquoit. She was shot, allegedy mistaken for a deer. But as Mike explains: “. . . accident is not a term we use in the in the Maine Warden Service. Game wardens understand that even when guns misfire or bullets ricochet, when feet stumble or fingers slip, there is always a trail of causation you can follow that will lead you back to an act of culpable negligence.” Maquoit is accessible only by boat or plane, so Mike is flown over to the island by his old friend, Charley Stevens (a retired patrol warden who still volunteered the use of his plane when the other planes in the warden Aviation Division were otherwise engaged). It is a bit awkward; Mike and Charley have been estranged since Mike’s relationship with Charley’s daughter Stacey ended back in the summer, after Stacey left to start a new life in Florida. Mike was perhaps more upset by the loss of his friendship with Charley than about the end of his relationship with Stacey: “Nothing on earth could have made me sadder. Charley Stevens was the closest thing I had ever had to a real father.” Maquoit, with a population of eighty-nine people, is primarily a lobster fishing community. But as Charley points out: “All these old fishing outposts are dying off as the groundfish disappear and the oceans warm up. Lobsters are moving north in the Gulf of Maine. Give it a few years and Maquoit will go dead in the offseason, too.” Doiron routinely fills readers in on many details about the flora and fauna of Maine, incorporating a lot of background on Maine seamlessly into his stories. In this book he has Mike observe: “Lobsters are cannibals. Leave them together in a tank without rubber bands around their claws, and they will dismember and devour each other in short order. Drop a bunch of lobstermen together on an island - Maquoit, for instance, twenty miles off the Maine coast - and they begin to resemble the cold-blooded creatures they catch.” He heard from the residents that violent feuds occurred between the lobstermen. In addition, drug use was high in Maine’s fishing communities. To add to their troubles, the island was overrun by deer. As Stacey, a wildlife biologist, told Mike at one point, the prime carrying capacity for a place like the island would be ten deer per square mile. The current estimate for Maquoit, based on their most recent survey, was seventy deer per square mile. The deer on the island were starving, and most of them were infested with Lyme-disease-carrying ticks. But the islanders didn’t want to give them up or stop hunting them. When Ariel was found dead, no one confessed to the shooting, but in spite of the small population on the island, there were plenty of suspects. None of the townspeople wanted to talk however. Mike was an outsider. Plus, he could leave; the rest had to stay there. As Mike goes around questioning people, he uncovers more and more layers to the puzzle. Finally, as he gets too close to an answer, his own life is in danger. Evaluation: I always love learning more about Maine from Doiron’s books. This one has more character development than suspense, as opposed to previous books, but with no less enjoyment for the reader. I always look forward to more stories in the series. Rating: 3.5/5

  17. 5 out of 5

    Roger

    Paul Doiron's mysteries featuring Mike Bowditch still seem fresh, like the new kids on the mystery scene, but STAY HIDDEN is already the ninth entry in the series. I still remember reading Doiron's first book, THE POACHER'S SON, after my oldest daughter gifted the novel as a Christmas present, cleverly picking the book out of that year's Edgar Awards list of best first novels. Doiron's productivity since that first book is rare, and he has done so while maintaining a high level of writing and st Paul Doiron's mysteries featuring Mike Bowditch still seem fresh, like the new kids on the mystery scene, but STAY HIDDEN is already the ninth entry in the series. I still remember reading Doiron's first book, THE POACHER'S SON, after my oldest daughter gifted the novel as a Christmas present, cleverly picking the book out of that year's Edgar Awards list of best first novels. Doiron's productivity since that first book is rare, and he has done so while maintaining a high level of writing and storytelling. Doiron is on that shortlist of authors who create a protagonist who can last for the long haul. The primary reason for Doiron's success is his ability to keep Bowditch interesting as he matures. In STAY HIDDEN, Bowditch is no longer a game warden, as he has been promoted to a Warden Investigator position, a job that takes him to the desolate and disconnected bleakness of Maquoit Island on his first case. Because of a coincidence of events, he goes to Maquoit Island without the swarm of other law enforcement investigators and specialists who would typically descend on a crime scene. In fact, he ends up on the island alone, stranded by events and weather. Bowditch is forced to stand on his own, on his first case, and opposed by the 80 or so permanent residents of Maquoit Island, a population that is parochial even by the fairly rigid standards of most Mainers. The story follows Bowditch as he struggles with the islanders and the investigation on his own. He also has to overcome the belief by most of his superiors and his colleagues that he is prone to acting as a lone eagle, often going off half-cocked and mucking up situations. Doiron has subtle ways he isolates Bowditch beyond the apparent geographic detachment he already faces, focusing our attention on his internal struggles and making his colleagues believe even more so that he is someone who doesn't work well with others. One example in STAY HIDDEN occurs when Bowditch loses his cell phone. That kind of event can cause panic amongst folks who live in major cities, causing them to feel lost. Imagine how that impacts Bowditch on an island well off the Maine coast? Bowditch is also entering new stages in his personal life. Stacy is gone, off to the Everglades. It is unclear if she will return. Even she seems of two minds about it (and that is much of the problem). Dani Tate appeared in the previous book, but she emerges here more forcefully as a possible romantic interest. Ariel Evans is introduced in STAY HIDDEN, as a willful reporter with money and a global stage. Her promised book about Maquoit Island may include a look at the actions of Warden Investigator Mike Bowditch, which suggests she may be around for future stories. I hope so. Paul Doiron has developed an iconic character in Mike Bowditch. Doiron also continues to describe a place most of us will never know on our own when he writes of the Maine wilderness and the people who live there, and he does so warts and all while making the reader appreciate the beauty of the land and the humanity of the people who strive to live on that land. I look forward to the next book in this series, confident that Paul Doiron will continue to impress. Wind and fog and cold are on the island. Deer too. It's not easy there.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    ARC/ Mystery: This book just came out so no spoilers here. This is book ninth book in the Mike Bowditch series and I got this from Amazon in lieu of an honest review. I originally turned it down, but I saw a positive review of it in the newspaper and thought I really needed to read a good who-done-it. First, let me say that I am bias to first person narrated novels where the protagonist(s) are isolated from the rest of the world; either in space, under water, the Upper P, or on an island. This ARC/ Mystery: This book just came out so no spoilers here. This is book ninth book in the Mike Bowditch series and I got this from Amazon in lieu of an honest review. I originally turned it down, but I saw a positive review of it in the newspaper and thought I really needed to read a good who-done-it. First, let me say that I am bias to first person narrated novels where the protagonist(s) are isolated from the rest of the world; either in space, under water, the Upper P, or on an island. This is an island book with the Maine island of Maquoit a fifteen minute flight to the mainland when it is sunny or completely isolated for days if the fog has rolls in. I really enjoyed the book at first, but when our hero Warden Mike’s partner leaves the island to testify at a trial and cannot return, I did not like it as much. Mike is all of 29 and does have a John Corey (Nelson DeMille’s best character) narration with humor. But Mike really needs to play that humor on someone else. Mike is too lone wolf in this case. I was really expecting Klesko to turn up sooner and banter between the two instead of Mike bantering with himself. I will say that I did not guess the murderer. I did not like the whole doppelgänger plot, but then again, I did. It was cliché at times, but then again, it did move the story along. There are neo-Nazis living on one side of the island, an ex-Hollywood mogul who is now a hermit, a cowardly constable, Boss Hog-like harbormaster, and lobstermen getting drunk until the catching season starts. I am recommending this book. It’s not terrific, but it did keep my interest.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sonica •TheReadingBeautyBlog

    Thank you St. Martins Press/Minotaur Books for my advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.  This title is set to hit shelves July 3. This was my first book by author, Paul Doiron, and my first true crime detective story.   It was a very slow burn  for me - but I guess that is how real-life crime investigations go.  I found the author took a little long on unveiling things and spent a lot of time on descriptions of the island and overall geography of the story's setting (which was pretty dar Thank you St. Martins Press/Minotaur Books for my advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.  This title is set to hit shelves July 3. This was my first book by author, Paul Doiron, and my first true crime detective story.   It was a very slow burn  for me - but I guess that is how real-life crime investigations go.  I found the author took a little long on unveiling things and spent a lot of time on descriptions of the island and overall geography of the story's setting (which was pretty darn creepy I must admit), but overall I thought it was well written, quick and easy to read.   I  enjoyed going through the motions of the investigation with Warden Investigator, Mike Bowditch, and experiencing the twists and turns that he faced with his long list of probable suspects.   The plot was well thought out, and although the ending was somewhat satisfying I expected a bit more punch. I think I have just been reading such fast-paced thrillers lately, I was expecting some of the same excitement.  Regardless, this one had my attention from cover to cover. The book is the ninth instalment in a series by the author, which I haven't read, and might explain my lack of appreciation for the details; but I didn't feel lost in any way with the characters given I didn't have the background from his previous books. A great mystery overall, and a great pick for true crime investigation lovers.  If you are a suspense thrill seeker, this may be a bit too slow for you but an enticing read nonetheless. My Rating: 3.5/5

  20. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    ok - there was so much I didn't like about this book...where to begin? Mike is an experienced game warden but has recently been promoted to investigator..and throughout the book he acted like he didn't know what he was doing; like he was someone completely new and out of the academy with no background. He is someone who has moved up the ladder - he has experience and training -instead we are subject to his self-doubt; to others wondering if he can handle the case - it was silly. The characters on ok - there was so much I didn't like about this book...where to begin? Mike is an experienced game warden but has recently been promoted to investigator..and throughout the book he acted like he didn't know what he was doing; like he was someone completely new and out of the academy with no background. He is someone who has moved up the ladder - he has experience and training -instead we are subject to his self-doubt; to others wondering if he can handle the case - it was silly. The characters on the island were so fake...like cardboard. The dialog was stilted and trite. The one character telling Mike at the end that she hopes his plane crashes...my god- what is she two years old? Most annoying though, was Ariel. Her faux-feminist dialog drove me up the the wall - and she was such an unpleasant person. I read the first Mike Bowditch book years ago - I can't remember anything about it - but I looked up my review and I liked it. I have not read any others in this series and I read a lot of mystery series and know that not every book in a series is a gem. This was is not a gem.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ed

    #9 in the Mike Bowditch series. This 2018 entry by author Doiron brings with it a strong sense of place as Warden Bowditch, now Warden Investigator, used to the Maine wilderness must investigate the insular community on tiny Maquoit Island. He must investigate a homicide from a hunting incident and none of the natives want him on the island or will assist in his investigation. A fascinating read though the complex plot may not come to the desired result. Ariel Evans apparently took a house on Mai #9 in the Mike Bowditch series. This 2018 entry by author Doiron brings with it a strong sense of place as Warden Bowditch, now Warden Investigator, used to the Maine wilderness must investigate the insular community on tiny Maquoit Island. He must investigate a homicide from a hunting incident and none of the natives want him on the island or will assist in his investigation. A fascinating read though the complex plot may not come to the desired result. Ariel Evans apparently took a house on Maine's Maquoit Island as part of her preparation for her next book, about Blake Markman, a Hollywood producer who was suspected of murdering his wife, but who evaded criminal charges and now lives alone on a small island near Maquoit. Though the initial police report is that the victim, who was hanging up some laundry to dry, was mistaken for a deer by hunter Kenneth Crowley, newly promoted Warden Investigator Mike Bowditch later learns that Crowley only found the body and never confessed to anything. That the dead woman was having an affair with one of the locals provides a possible murder motive, but the case takes a bizarre turn when a woman turns up claiming to be Ariel.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Belva

    Paul Doiron didn't miss a single negative stereotype about lobster men and islanders when he wrote Stay Hidden. I really found his sweeping generalizations offensive. I also found his main character, Mike Bowditch, a poor representation of the Maine Warden Service. Some of Bowditch's exploits were quite stupid (especially the kayak episode). Doiron's writing style seemed choppy and stilted, but the plot did hold my interest. In the end, the Bowditch character solves the case, mostly by dumb luck Paul Doiron didn't miss a single negative stereotype about lobster men and islanders when he wrote Stay Hidden. I really found his sweeping generalizations offensive. I also found his main character, Mike Bowditch, a poor representation of the Maine Warden Service. Some of Bowditch's exploits were quite stupid (especially the kayak episode). Doiron's writing style seemed choppy and stilted, but the plot did hold my interest. In the end, the Bowditch character solves the case, mostly by dumb luck, I think. I noticed that other people complained that his name selection for the Reed family characters was confusing. Most of them began with the letter H (Harmon, Hiram, Holly, etc.). I didn't have a problem with it until he used the wrong name for one of them and I realized that it was either a typo ( I found quite a few typos, by the way) or the author was confused himself.

  23. 3 out of 5

    Donna Hines

    A remote wilderness. A woman shot by a deer hunter. Case closed! Now wait a second , not so fast. This may not be all it's cracked up to be. Ariel Evans now may be the community target #1 in the eyes of many as an author who was in the process of writing about the islands notorious hermit. Just one problem, her rented cottage is void of notes. Ok, that's a slight problem we cannot overlook. So let's go on a little trip say we take a ferry and search for answers. Oh shoot. Look who just stepped off the f A remote wilderness. A woman shot by a deer hunter. Case closed! Now wait a second , not so fast. This may not be all it's cracked up to be. Ariel Evans now may be the community target #1 in the eyes of many as an author who was in the process of writing about the islands notorious hermit. Just one problem, her rented cottage is void of notes. Ok, that's a slight problem we cannot overlook. So let's go on a little trip say we take a ferry and search for answers. Oh shoot. Look who just stepped off the ferry! Like hell, it's the dead woman herself! For heaven's sake this isn't happening .... Oh but it's and you best better hang on as this is an about face with the victim now being the prosecutor in her own case and she might just take Mike along for the ride .

  24. 4 out of 5

    Don Gorman

    (3). I don't know what it is about park ranger sorts that make them such likely protagonists but it seems like we have plenty of them out there, male and female alike. Mike Bowditch is a very engaging one. I think I have read just one of the books in this series previously and when I saw the review of this one somewhere I reserved it at the library. This is a solid effort. Strong from the start, Bowditch is not a superhero or superbrain but a smart, introspective kind of guy. The layers peel bac (3). I don't know what it is about park ranger sorts that make them such likely protagonists but it seems like we have plenty of them out there, male and female alike. Mike Bowditch is a very engaging one. I think I have read just one of the books in this series previously and when I saw the review of this one somewhere I reserved it at the library. This is a solid effort. Strong from the start, Bowditch is not a superhero or superbrain but a smart, introspective kind of guy. The layers peel back nicely here and we certainly have a colorful cast of characters on this little Maine island where everything goes down. As is typical with these books, a tiny bit weak at the end but there is plenty of action along the way. A nice ride.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Bowe

    A good story about a new game warden called to investigate an "accidental" hunting accident on a tiny island of the coast of Maine. The people of the island were very protective of each other (aside from a rivarly with a certain family).... Even to the point of covering up crimes and secrets. I felt bad for Mike and that the uslanders hated him at the end. I'll probably try more books by this author.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Richard J.

    Outstanding. Mike Bowditch continues to grow and the cases he must solve get twister. One of the best of the series.

  27. 3 out of 5

    Jacki (Julia Flyte)

    I love this series and every year I wait eagerly for the next one. It's about Mike Bowditch, formerly a game warden in rural Maine, now recently promoted to Warden Investigator. He travels to Maquoit, a small island off the coast of Maine, to investigate a hunting incident in which a young woman has been shot and killed. However when he arrives he finds that the shooter has not come forward and there is a possibility that the shooting was not even accidental. Hindering his investigation are the p I love this series and every year I wait eagerly for the next one. It's about Mike Bowditch, formerly a game warden in rural Maine, now recently promoted to Warden Investigator. He travels to Maquoit, a small island off the coast of Maine, to investigate a hunting incident in which a young woman has been shot and killed. However when he arrives he finds that the shooter has not come forward and there is a possibility that the shooting was not even accidental. Hindering his investigation are the patchy communications on the island, the almost permanent fog and the locals who seem unwilling to co-operate. This series is a favourite of mine, but I have to say I think it's one of the weakest in the series. The characters seemed more like caricatures and Bowditch seemed to bumble around without any purpose. It seemed to drag a bit and then come together in an overly convenient way. Oh and the dust jacket carried a major spoiler. Boo hiss.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Andy Plonka

    Once the confusion about one of the main character's death and subsequent r"resurrection" are resolved the story line is pretty straightforward but the descriptions of the island off the Maine coast as well as the permanent residents of the island provides some interest.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Paula

    9th in the series and it was a good suspense read.

  30. 3 out of 5

    Art

    Maine game warden Mike Bowditch moves from a district to become an investigator in this outstanding installment of Paul Doiron's well-written series. Doiron, former editor of Downeast magazine, captures Maine and its people well, while continuing to grow Bowditch's character and potential. Making him an investigator gives him the entire state as a district. And his first case does not disappoint. As the least experienced investigator, Bowditch is left in the office while everyone else goes out on a Maine game warden Mike Bowditch moves from a district to become an investigator in this outstanding installment of Paul Doiron's well-written series. Doiron, former editor of Downeast magazine, captures Maine and its people well, while continuing to grow Bowditch's character and potential. Making him an investigator gives him the entire state as a district. And his first case does not disappoint. As the least experienced investigator, Bowditch is left in the office while everyone else goes out on a big hunting incident. But when a second shooting is reported, Mike is on his own investigating an apparent hunting fatality on a Maine island. It's an outstaning entry in a great series.

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