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To Kill a Mockingbird: A Graphic Novel

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A beautifully crafted graphic novel adaptation of Harper Lee’s beloved, Pulitzer prize–winning American classic. "Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit ‘em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird." A haunting portrait of race and class, innocence and injustice, hypocrisy and heroism, tradition and transformation in the Deep South of the 1930s, Harper Lee’s T A beautifully crafted graphic novel adaptation of Harper Lee’s beloved, Pulitzer prize–winning American classic. "Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit ‘em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird." A haunting portrait of race and class, innocence and injustice, hypocrisy and heroism, tradition and transformation in the Deep South of the 1930s, Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird remains as important today as it was upon its initial publication in 1960, during the turbulent years of the Civil Rights movement. Now, this most beloved and acclaimed novel is reborn for a new age as a gorgeous graphic novel. Scout, Gem, Boo Radley, Atticus Finch, and the small town of Maycomb, Alabama, are all captured in vivid and moving illustrations by artist Fred Fordham. Enduring in vision, Harper Lee’s timeless novel illuminates the complexities of human nature and the depths of the human heart with humor, unwavering honesty, and a tender, nostalgic beauty. Lifetime admirers and new readers alike will be touched by this special visual edition that joins the ranks of the graphic novel adaptations of A Wrinkle in Time and The Alchemist.


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A beautifully crafted graphic novel adaptation of Harper Lee’s beloved, Pulitzer prize–winning American classic. "Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit ‘em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird." A haunting portrait of race and class, innocence and injustice, hypocrisy and heroism, tradition and transformation in the Deep South of the 1930s, Harper Lee’s T A beautifully crafted graphic novel adaptation of Harper Lee’s beloved, Pulitzer prize–winning American classic. "Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit ‘em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird." A haunting portrait of race and class, innocence and injustice, hypocrisy and heroism, tradition and transformation in the Deep South of the 1930s, Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird remains as important today as it was upon its initial publication in 1960, during the turbulent years of the Civil Rights movement. Now, this most beloved and acclaimed novel is reborn for a new age as a gorgeous graphic novel. Scout, Gem, Boo Radley, Atticus Finch, and the small town of Maycomb, Alabama, are all captured in vivid and moving illustrations by artist Fred Fordham. Enduring in vision, Harper Lee’s timeless novel illuminates the complexities of human nature and the depths of the human heart with humor, unwavering honesty, and a tender, nostalgic beauty. Lifetime admirers and new readers alike will be touched by this special visual edition that joins the ranks of the graphic novel adaptations of A Wrinkle in Time and The Alchemist.

30 review for To Kill a Mockingbird: A Graphic Novel

  1. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    To Kill a Mockingbird: A Graphic Novel is a 2018 Harper publication. I’m not going to review the plot of ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’, but will instead offer you a review of the graphic novel version of the beloved classic. I am new to the graphic novel category and am still getting my sea legs, so to speak, but I have discovered one of the best ways to acclimate myself is by reading familiar stories in the graphic novel format. So far, I am having a blast re-reading a few classics and having that e To Kill a Mockingbird: A Graphic Novel is a 2018 Harper publication. I’m not going to review the plot of ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’, but will instead offer you a review of the graphic novel version of the beloved classic. I am new to the graphic novel category and am still getting my sea legs, so to speak, but I have discovered one of the best ways to acclimate myself is by reading familiar stories in the graphic novel format. So far, I am having a blast re-reading a few classics and having that experience enhanced by graphic art or drawings, depicting the scenes in the book. One of my initial concerns was for the respect of the material, especially when we are talking about one of the most cherished books ever written. I was equal parts skeptical and excited. I initially thought it was a cool idea, but, I worried that it might somehow reduce the impact of the story. However, the artwork is simply wonderful! Lovely and detailed, colorized illustrations capture the essence of the novel, and will appeal to anyone who loves the story, but will certainly entice younger readers to read this important story, without thinking of it as homework. I soon forgot my skepticism and reacquainted myself with this story all over again, enjoying it anew in a fresh and revitalized way. There are many ways to enjoy stories and every one of them are valid and useful. Graphic novels are one more way to enjoy books and I’m very pleased to have discovered, and approached it with an open mind, this format, which gives me an even deeper appreciation for classic or familiar stories, but also brings new and imaginative ones to my attention, broadening my scope of learning and entertainment.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin

    This graphic novel really does justice to the original book! This is one of my favorite books and I love the movie! Anyone who is a fan of this book will love this graphic novel. I have went a little overboard on the pictures I added so bear with me 😊 Happy Reading! Mel 🖤🐶🐺🐾

  3. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Well. . . it's official. I'm in love again. This time it's a widower, a man in his late 40s. . . father of two. . . an attorney. His name is Atticus Finch. He lives in the Deep South, among an appalling racism that is shoulder deep, yet he has taught his children that being a racist is like cheating. . . cheating at being human. He takes every difficult case, even if the client can't properly pay him, and he raises his kids, rather than pawning them off on female relatives, and he is always there. . Well. . . it's official. I'm in love again. This time it's a widower, a man in his late 40s. . . father of two. . . an attorney. His name is Atticus Finch. He lives in the Deep South, among an appalling racism that is shoulder deep, yet he has taught his children that being a racist is like cheating. . . cheating at being human. He takes every difficult case, even if the client can't properly pay him, and he raises his kids, rather than pawning them off on female relatives, and he is always there. . . always there. . . for his children, his community, his clients, his neighbors. Yep, he's there for his neighbors, and that Miss Maudie across the street knows it, too. It's so obvious that she wants to get her gloved hands all over him. But, guess what, Maudie? I make a meaner casserole than you. I make a meaner cobbler, too. (Disclaimer: this is absolutely untrue). Either way, back away, Maudie, 'cause Atticus Finch is my dream man, right up there with Augustus McCrae and Rhett Butler. . . and, rumor has it. . . he looks a lot like Gregory Peck, too. Hell, even as a drawing. . . he's a giant of a man. It was times like these when I thought my father, who hated guns and had never been to any wars, was the bravest man who ever lived.

  4. 3 out of 5

    Rebecca

    To my surprise, I’ve actually rated this higher than Harper Lee’s original; I’d attribute that to the fact that I read the novel in high school and haven’t reread it since then, so I tend to associate it with boring essay assignments and a sense of duty. I’m also surprised by how little I remembered of the plot from the book or the Gregory Peck movie, such that there were a few moments here that actually made me gasp. Fordham’s version is highly faithful, including plenty of direct quotes from t To my surprise, I’ve actually rated this higher than Harper Lee’s original; I’d attribute that to the fact that I read the novel in high school and haven’t reread it since then, so I tend to associate it with boring essay assignments and a sense of duty. I’m also surprised by how little I remembered of the plot from the book or the Gregory Peck movie, such that there were a few moments here that actually made me gasp. Fordham’s version is highly faithful, including plenty of direct quotes from the book, and the artwork is very effective. My only gripe would be that I think Scout looks a bit too old at times, more of a preteen than a tomboy. Look out for the mockingbird on the fence on three pages. (What do you want to bet high school students will start reading this instead of the full novel?! In all honesty, if it gets them engaged in the story and characters in a way they wouldn’t be otherwise, that’s no bad thing in my opinion.) A favorite line: (Atticus to Scout) “Simply because we were licked a hundred years before we started is no reason for us not to try to win.”

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tucker Almengor

    I really, really enjoyed this! I loved the original book and it was so so cool to see it as a graphic novel. The drawings are amazing and the color is perfect. The story is just as funny and great as it was originally. View my review of To Kill A Mockingbird here Thank you so much Harper Collins for an Advanced Reader's Copy!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    This graphic novel is a perfect complement and homage to the novel, and much closer to the original manuscript than the classic film. It is in no way a replacement, but an adaptation that should make both English teachers and students very happy. For the full review: https://paulspicks.blog/2018/10/30/to... For all my reviews: https://paulspicks.blog

  7. 3 out of 5

    katyjanereads

    1. The novel is my favorite book of all time and this graphic novel has become my favorite graphic novel. 2. I loved the pictures. 3. As soon as I started reading, it was like going back to an old friend. Scout made me laugh, Atticus made me want to marry him, my heart soared with the mockingbirds. 4. I read this book in high school and gravitated towards the kindness themes, but I don’t guess I understood the Mockingbird theme. I would say both Boo and Tom are Mockingbirds. 5. I learned a flivver 1. The novel is my favorite book of all time and this graphic novel has become my favorite graphic novel. 2. I loved the pictures. 3. As soon as I started reading, it was like going back to an old friend. Scout made me laugh, Atticus made me want to marry him, my heart soared with the mockingbirds. 4. I read this book in high school and gravitated towards the kindness themes, but I don’t guess I understood the Mockingbird theme. I would say both Boo and Tom are Mockingbirds. 5. I learned a flivver is a cheap car. 6. It always makes me sad that Boo’s dad plugged up the knothole. 7. One of my favorite parts is when Scout runs over to Mr. Cunningham in the mob and talks about how nice his son is and her being nice breaks up the mob. 8. I learned that my grandma has scuppernongs in her yard and I’ve eaten them all my life but just called them grapes. 9. Breaks my heart that Boo saves Scout and Jem and then they never see him again. 10. Still some favorite quotes: -“I’m Charles Baker Harris. I can read.” “So what?” “I just thought you’d like to know I can read. You got anything needs readin’ I can do it.” “In all his life, Jem has never declined a dare. The bet was settled at Dill’s copy of The Gray Ghost against two of Jem’s Tom Swifts. “Until I feared I would lose it, I never loved to read. One does not love breathing.” “When I asked Jem what entailment was, and Jem described it as a condition of having your tail in a crack.” “If you can learn a simple trick, Scout, you’ll get along a lot better with all kinds of folks. You never understand a person until you consider things from his point of view-until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.” “Simply because we were licked a hundred years before we started is no reason for us not to try to win.” “Talking to Francis gave me the sensation of settling slowly to the bottom of the ocean.” “Uncle Jack?” “Ma’am?” “What’s a whore lady?” “Remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.” When Atticus made Jem read to Mrs. Dubose: “I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand.” When Scout wasn’t going to tell that Boo killed Mr. Ewell: “Well, it’d be sort of like shootin’ a Mockingbird wouldn’t it?” “Atticus, he was real nice.” “Most people are, Scout. When you finally see them.”

  8. 5 out of 5

    steph

    If you are a fan of both graphic novels AND To Kill a Mockingbird, pick this up. This is a gorgeous graphic novel first and foremost. Fordham’s artwork is well done, very effective and quite faithful to the book. There are plenty of direct quotes from the book and in places that he has edited or adapted, the panels move the story along quite well. I am a big fan of TKaM and I was a little leery of reading a graphic novel version of it but when it come in from the library I was blown away by how b If you are a fan of both graphic novels AND To Kill a Mockingbird, pick this up. This is a gorgeous graphic novel first and foremost. Fordham’s artwork is well done, very effective and quite faithful to the book. There are plenty of direct quotes from the book and in places that he has edited or adapted, the panels move the story along quite well. I am a big fan of TKaM and I was a little leery of reading a graphic novel version of it but when it come in from the library I was blown away by how beautiful the artwork is. And then once I started reading I saw how faithful to the book it was. It is adapted, so some things are left out but I only saw one scene while reading that I knew for a fact had been edited (granted though, it's been awhile since I've read TKaM so there might be more). I love the fact that this book is hardcover and the binding is top notch (You wouldn't believe the amount of children's/teen's graphic novel I order at work that fall apart in less than 6 months because the binding is non-existent :sigh:). Honestly this graphic novel was a absolute joy to read. I would not recommend reading it in place of the novel (read the novel first!) but as a companion to the book I would completely recommend or for a individual that is on the fence about TKaM or has trouble with long novels etc. Pick this up. I will definitely be on the lookout for more of Fordham's work. He did an amazing job here.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    Drawing upon some of richest source material in American literature, Fred Fordham delivers a reverential adaptation. While the art can be a bit stiff and conservative, the story remains as powerful as ever in this new form. I gulped it down in one sitting.

  10. 3 out of 5

    Kyra Leseberg (Roots & Reads)

    To Kill A Mockingbird should need no introduction.  It is an American classic and arguably the most important work in American literature in the 20th century. I was thrilled to learn that it was being adapted into a graphic novel, which could make the story more accessible to young readers by combining visual art and language to share this enduring story. The story of a black man wrongly accused of a crime by a white woman in the Deep South of the 1930's and the neighborhood legend of a man named To Kill A Mockingbird should need no introduction.  It is an American classic and arguably the most important work in American literature in the 20th century. I was thrilled to learn that it was being adapted into a graphic novel, which could make the story more accessible to young readers by combining visual art and language to share this enduring story. The story of a black man wrongly accused of a crime by a white woman in the Deep South of the 1930's and the neighborhood legend of a man named Boo who never leaves his house are both compelling pieces of the tale surrounding the Finch family.   With the perfect innocence of childhood, Scout and Jem Finch navigate their small town of Maycomb that is starkly divided by race and class.  While most adults seem to believe these are complicated topics, Scout and Jem are learning right and wrong from their father, Atticus Finch, who has a wise way of imparting his values and beliefs without imposing them on his children. To Kill A Mockingbird is a frequently challenged or banned book due to its content and language.  For me, it is an accurate and heartbreaking portrayal of a time period in the American South told with unflinching honesty through the innocence of a child.  It is timeless story that explores the complexities of human nature and the brutal injustices in our history. To Kill A Mockingbird: A Graphic Novel is an excellent adaptation that remains true to the story by faithfully following the plot of the novel (though obviously a condensed version) with many direct quotes and bright, emotive illustrations.  This is a perfect way to introduce young people to Harper Lee's classic novel and hopefully capture their hearts and minds and open a discussion on the many heavy but necessary subjects tackled in the story. Many thanks to Harper Collins and Edelweiss for providing me with a DRC in exchange for my honest review.  To Kill A Mockingbird: A Graphic Novel is scheduled for release on October 30, 2018. For more full reviews, visit www.rootsandreads.wordpress.com

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kayleigh

    This book is a must have for any fans of To Kill A Mockingbird. The illustrations are gorgeous and the story as compelling as ever and I very much enjoyed reading it! Thank you to Windmill Books for kindly sending me a copy, I loved it and it’s getting a proud place on my shelf!

  12. 5 out of 5

    G.

    I’m not a big fan of graphic novel adaptations but Fred Fordham’s stunning version of To Kill a Mockingbird brought that novel to life in such a powerful way, I’m going to recommend it to teachers and librarians as perhaps the best way to get kids to experience this classic story. Certainly made me see it in a new light and I’ve written two books about it. Highly recommended.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bunni

    AHHHHHHHHHAAAA AMAZING

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mr. Armstrong

    As perfect an adaptation as you could possibly pull off. I loved every page, every image, every choice.

  15. 3 out of 5

    Kelly Hager

    I'm just going to discuss the adaptation as a graphic novel, because hopefully by now, you've all read it. (If not, please read it. It's amazing.) I'm not really a huge fan of graphic novels, although I've tried to be. There are great ones, and there are a bunch that I've loved, but by and large, I prefer books with prose and without pictures. I was also incredibly skeptical about the need to release arguably the greatest American novel as a graphic novel. It doesn't need a gimmick to get people I'm just going to discuss the adaptation as a graphic novel, because hopefully by now, you've all read it. (If not, please read it. It's amazing.) I'm not really a huge fan of graphic novels, although I've tried to be. There are great ones, and there are a bunch that I've loved, but by and large, I prefer books with prose and without pictures. I was also incredibly skeptical about the need to release arguably the greatest American novel as a graphic novel. It doesn't need a gimmick to get people to read it; it's phenomenal by itself. I said that to say this: This adaptation is fantastic. The illustrations are sharp and everyone looks as they're described in the novel. (Which is to say that no, Atticus doesn't really look like Gregory Peck.) This is a fantastic version and if you know someone who hasn't read TKAM, this could be a good gateway. I think a lot of people may be uneasy about reading something that seems like homework if that's all they know about it. Graphic novels are a lot less intimidating. (I don't mean that to sound snobby and yes, I know there are a lot of excellent graphic novels.) Highly recommended in any form.

  16. 3 out of 5

    Melissa

    This is a very lovely adaptation of Harper Lee's novel. The colors and art are best when it's not dark (i.e. the walk home after the Maycomb pageant as a ham was really murky). There are some sections where certain angles or characters owe a huge debt to the TKAM movie. What I found missing was all the "local color" that comes through in Scout's internal monologue about Maycomb and all its goings on, good and bad. It gets shoe-horned in rather awkwardly at times when it's not cut entirely (like, This is a very lovely adaptation of Harper Lee's novel. The colors and art are best when it's not dark (i.e. the walk home after the Maycomb pageant as a ham was really murky). There are some sections where certain angles or characters owe a huge debt to the TKAM movie. What I found missing was all the "local color" that comes through in Scout's internal monologue about Maycomb and all its goings on, good and bad. It gets shoe-horned in rather awkwardly at times when it's not cut entirely (like, where is the little tidbit that Dill's shirt and pants buttoned together?).

  17. 3 out of 5

    Fred Slusher

    I loved revisiting these characters and this story. Fred Fordham’s gorgeous and evocative illustrations were a perfect companion to Harper Lee’s words. Wherever she is, I hope she is bearing witness.

  18. 4 out of 5

    DEHAN

    এইটা একটা পিচচি রে নিয়া কাহিনী । বই পড়ি নাই কিনতু চলচচিতর দেখেছিলাম, ভালোই লাগছিলো। পিচচিটার মা থাকে না শুধু বাপ আর বড় ভাই থাকে। ওদের এলাকায় একটা বাড়ি নিয়ে ওদের মধযে অনেক গুজব চালু ছিলো। সবাই ভাবতো ওখানে এমন একজন থাকে যিনি মানুষ খুন করেছিলো। এদিকে আবার পিচচির বাপ যিনি পেশায় একজন উকিল থাকেন তিনি একজন নিগরোর পকষ হয়ে লড়তে গেলে তাঁর সবজাতিরা তাঁর উপর অনেক চটে যায় ...এভাবেই এগুতে থাকে এইটা একটা পিচ্চি রে নিয়া কাহিনী । বই পড়ি নাই কিন্তু চলচ্চিত্র দেখেছিলাম, ভালোই লাগছিলো। পিচ্চিটার মা থাকে না শুধু বাপ আর বড় ভাই থাকে। ওদের এলাকায় একটা বাড়ি নিয়ে ওদের মধ্যে অনেক গুজব চালু ছিলো। সবাই ভাবতো ওখানে এমন একজন থাকে যিনি মানুষ খুন করেছিলো। এদিকে আবার পিচ্চির বাপ যিনি পেশায় একজন উকিল থাকেন তিনি একজন নিগ্রোর পক্ষ হয়ে লড়তে গেলে তাঁর স্বজাতিরা তাঁর উপর অনেক চটে যায় ...এভাবেই এগুতে থাকে

  19. 3 out of 5

    Linda Quinn

    This is a passable adaptation of Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird. Admittedly TKAM is my favorite book of all time so at first I was distracted and dismayed by the graphic novel as so much of Lee's beautiful writing was truncated and changed to fit the format. I thought the part with the trial of Tom Robinson was well done however, and if this is the only way some people will be introduced to this story it has a great value just for that.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    A faithful adaptation, for better or worse. (Full disclosure: I received a free e-ARC for review through Edelweiss. Trigger warning for rape and racist violence.) My feelings on this are conflicted and messy: - How do you judge an adaptation of an existing work: on its own merits, or in its faithfulness to the source material? On the latter point, Fred Fordham's adaptation is a definite success. His graphic novel adaptation is loyal to both the plot and tone of Harper Lee's classic, and even plays A faithful adaptation, for better or worse. (Full disclosure: I received a free e-ARC for review through Edelweiss. Trigger warning for rape and racist violence.) My feelings on this are conflicted and messy: - How do you judge an adaptation of an existing work: on its own merits, or in its faithfulness to the source material? On the latter point, Fred Fordham's adaptation is a definite success. His graphic novel adaptation is loyal to both the plot and tone of Harper Lee's classic, and even plays on the nostalgia of the 1962 movie. Comic book Atticus is a dead ringer for Gregory Peck, and the Finch kids resemble their respective actors as well. - My first experience with To Kill a Mockingbird was as a tween, well before I had to tools and knowledge to identify its more problematic aspects, chiefly the novel's inherent racism. Revisiting the story as an adult, in a different format, was...jarring. Some of the racism is plainly evident, e.g., is it ever okay for a white writer to use the n-word, even if historically accurate? And isn't it kind of gross for a story about Jim Crow racism and the lynching of a black man to center white voices? But there are so many layers to unpack, including liberal hero Atticus Finch's racism. (If he existed today, Atticus might be one of people pleading for "civility" from both sides. Yuck.) I found myself cringing as much as tearing up. And that's kind of the crux of the matter, right? No doubt To Kill a Mockingbird: A Graphic Novel will evoke all sorts of nostalgia (coupled with an irrational desire to protect and defend a cherished piece of one's childhood), especially in white Americans; but don't let that prevent you from engaging with the book critically. fwiw, I'd love to see a reimagining of Harper Lee's story told from Calpurnia or Helen Robinson's perspective. http://www.easyvegan.info/2019/01/08/...

  21. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    I think it's assumed, rightfully, that this is a review of the graphic novel and not of To Kill a Mockingbird itself. Just wanted to make that clear! First, the things I loved: the cover art is lovely and symbolic and the book is beautifully bound with thick paper and a spine that bends without cracking. I know other book geeks will appreciate these things! It feels substantial in your hands. Now, the things I didn't love. First, I didn't love that Ford chose to move around scenes to follow or pr I think it's assumed, rightfully, that this is a review of the graphic novel and not of To Kill a Mockingbird itself. Just wanted to make that clear! First, the things I loved: the cover art is lovely and symbolic and the book is beautifully bound with thick paper and a spine that bends without cracking. I know other book geeks will appreciate these things! It feels substantial in your hands. Now, the things I didn't love. First, I didn't love that Ford chose to move around scenes to follow or precede other scenes in a way that is inconsistent with the original. Second, the illustrations, while tinted in a lovely shade and sharply drawn, left a lot to be desired in terms of conveying emotion. Nearly all of the humor, of which there is plenty in the novel, has failed to be translated to the page. I am sure that humor is one of the most difficult emotions to play out in a graphic novel, but that emotion is so important to the story. In addition, some of the characters are difficult to tell apart much of the time (Dill and Jem, for instance) and others look just like the actors who play them in the movie (Heck Tate, for sure.) If this graphic novel gets people to pick up and read this story where the original book has not, then it's a victory. However, this just didn't feel like it was necessary for this particular book and actually ended up taking away a lot of important emotional elements of the original. As a teacher who reads this book with my students every year, it is something that I might use as a supplement here and there, but would never replace the original text with this.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    Adapting a novel as universally beloved as Harper Lee's Pulitzer Prize-winning TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD into a graphic novel is fraught with peril. For many students, Lee's compassionate and humorous coming-of-age tale is their first exposure to grappling with issues of racial inequality, gender roles and compassion for those different in color, class and beliefs. Nevertheless, Fred Fordham (who illustrated Philip Pullman's "The Adventures of John Blake: Mystery of the Ghost Ship") has done a magni Adapting a novel as universally beloved as Harper Lee's Pulitzer Prize-winning TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD into a graphic novel is fraught with peril. For many students, Lee's compassionate and humorous coming-of-age tale is their first exposure to grappling with issues of racial inequality, gender roles and compassion for those different in color, class and beliefs. Nevertheless, Fred Fordham (who illustrated Philip Pullman's "The Adventures of John Blake: Mystery of the Ghost Ship") has done a magnificent job adapting and illustrating the 1960 classic. Set in Alabama over a three-year period (1933-1936), TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD is told from the point of view of six-year-old Jean Louise Finch (aka Scout), whose lawyer father is defending a black man accused of raping a white woman. Although judiciously edited, Fordham's adaptation is amazingly faithful to the novel--even more faithful than Horton Foote's Oscar-winning screenplay for the 1962 film starring Gregory Peck as lawyer Atticus Finch. (Atticus's sister, Aunt Alexandra, was absent from the film but is present in this new medium. Mrs. Dubose, the antebellum morphine addict down the street, also regains her prominence from the novel.) Fordham's full-color illustrations are vibrant, imaginative and detailed. And his text adaption retains the simple poetry and wry humor of Lee's writing. This beautiful, full-color graphic novel incarnation is sure to please Lee's fans and win new devotees. Harper Lee's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel is adapted into a magnificent graphic novel by Fred Fordham.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    This was a great adaptation. It's been over 10 years since I've revisited this story, and I did not enjoy it in high school. It's nice to find myself more than enjoying it now.

  24. 3 out of 5

    Online Eccentric Librarian

    More reviews (and no fluff) on the blog http://surrealtalvi.wordpress.com/ I'm probably one of the few Americans not to have had this in school and never really got around to reading it after. So I was intrigued by this idea of a graphic novel: would I understand from this treatment why this is such a classic and why it has moved so many people? And the answer was yes - I was mesmerized from the beginning and due to what has to be a very faithful following of the novel, I could very easily see More reviews (and no fluff) on the blog http://surrealtalvi.wordpress.com/ I'm probably one of the few Americans not to have had this in school and never really got around to reading it after. So I was intrigued by this idea of a graphic novel: would I understand from this treatment why this is such a classic and why it has moved so many people? And the answer was yes - I was mesmerized from the beginning and due to what has to be a very faithful following of the novel, I could very easily see why this has received so many awards and accolades. I felt the mood and the flavor of the South through the panels as well as the so much of the undercurrents that must be in the novel. Story: Ordinarily, I would post a summary of the story here. But this is a classic and it is best described as a novel dealing with prejudices (against race, religion, gender, even age). The panels are cleanly laid out and the language looks to have been taken directly from the book. Main character Scout was easy to determine but some of the boys were a bit confusing in their similarity. But the story is drawn in a 1930s Depression era style that suits the story and complements Lee's book well. Of course, a graphic novel has to find the nuances in picture form and there was quite a bit of it in here. From sidelong glances to closeups of scratched and battered hands. The book takes its time and doesn't over-condense the story. For a graphic novel, this is fairly meaty and with quite a few pages - the artist clearly took his time with this adaptation. In the artist's notes, he discusses being faithful to the book and not reinterpreting it or modernizing it. I really respect that considering the book is truly a snapshot of time and place - and is palatable as it is. In all, I enjoyed this graphic novel as an excellent introduction to the book and look forward to reading the book in the future. Reviewed from an advance reader copy provided by the publisher.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jaclyn (sixminutesforme)

    Happy publication day to this gem! For fans of the original Harper Lee classic, this graphic novel adapted and illustrated by Fred Fordham will not disappoint! This adaptation stays true to Lee’s text, including some of the most often quoted excerpts. My main interest in this pertained to how the artwork would be used to compliment Lee’s original narrative and prose (which Fordham notes he stays quite true too). I found some of the earlier artwork didn’t convey as much depth as the latter part of Happy publication day to this gem! For fans of the original Harper Lee classic, this graphic novel adapted and illustrated by Fred Fordham will not disappoint! This adaptation stays true to Lee’s text, including some of the most often quoted excerpts. My main interest in this pertained to how the artwork would be used to compliment Lee’s original narrative and prose (which Fordham notes he stays quite true too). I found some of the earlier artwork didn’t convey as much depth as the latter part of the book did. For me, the real beauty of the adaptation came through in those difficult final scenes - the court scene particularly was so wonderfully done, both Atticus addressing the jury in closing and then Tom’s reaction to the verdict. The movement between angles and the cinematic feel to it were cleverly done and really highlighted the emotion of those scenes. I enjoyed this adaptation and thought it did justice to the original Southern classic. While I still don’t think anything can replace Lee’s prose, this is a welcome companion read, and I think would be fascinating to include alongside the original on a school syllabus! Thanks to @harperbooks @jenmurfee for sending me an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    I was given a copy of this graphic novel by Harper Collins in exchange for an honest review. Today's post is on To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee as adapted and Illustrated by Fred Fordham. It is 288 pages long and is published by Harper Collins. The cover is a picture of Scout from behind looking at her father and Tom Robinson. The intended reader is someone who likes graphic novels, classic novels, and time tested stories. There is very foul language, talk of rape, and violence in this novel. I was given a copy of this graphic novel by Harper Collins in exchange for an honest review. Today's post is on To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee as adapted and Illustrated by Fred Fordham. It is 288 pages long and is published by Harper Collins. The cover is a picture of Scout from behind looking at her father and Tom Robinson. The intended reader is someone who likes graphic novels, classic novels, and time tested stories. There is very foul language, talk of rape, and violence in this novel. The story is told from third person close of Scout, the main character. There Be Spoilers Ahead. From the back of the book- A beautifully crafted graphic novel adaptation of Harper Lee’s beloved, Pulitzer prize–winning American classic. "Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit ‘em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird." A haunting portrait of race and class, innocence and injustice, hypocrisy and heroism, tradition and transformation in the Deep South of the 1930s, Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird remains as important today as it was upon its initial publication in 1960, during the turbulent years of the Civil Rights movement. Now, this most beloved and acclaimed novel is reborn for a new age as a gorgeous graphic novel. Scout, Gem, Boo Radley, Atticus Finch, and the small town of Maycomb, Alabama, are all captured in vivid and moving illustrations by artist Fred Fordham. Review- A wonderful adaptation of a classic that adds to the story. Fordham takes a very hard story and gives it new life for a new, younger audience in this graphic novel adaptation. He does not change any of the language, so we read the very hard, very cruel words of 1930's Alabama. He does not change the tragic outcome, with his illustrations he makes the cruelty even more clear with the characters faces and the shock of the ending not lost in translation. By sticking so close to the original story Fordham really brings this tragic tale into the modern reader's hands. The art style is good without being too intricate and that would not have worked with this story and the characters in it. This is a great way to get reluctant readers to try this story and experience it for themselves. I give this book a Five out of Five stars.

  27. 3 out of 5

    Pop Bop

    A Laudable Effort We have the book, in almost every iteration and form you could imagine. We have the movie. The book is routinely honored as America's favorite. The movie is always on top-ten lists and features Gregory Peck in the role he was born to play. Heck, even Elmer Bernstein's score for the movie ranks 17th on the alltime AFI movie score list. So, do we need a graphic novel version? Well, sure. It's not essential, and this version didn't add anything new to the experience for me, but if i A Laudable Effort We have the book, in almost every iteration and form you could imagine. We have the movie. The book is routinely honored as America's favorite. The movie is always on top-ten lists and features Gregory Peck in the role he was born to play. Heck, even Elmer Bernstein's score for the movie ranks 17th on the alltime AFI movie score list. So, do we need a graphic novel version? Well, sure. It's not essential, and this version didn't add anything new to the experience for me, but if it makes the novel available and accessible to even one more reader, then it seems to me that that is enough to make it worthwhile. The author has wisely decided to stick closely to the book and to avoid any impulse to modify, "improve", modernize, or otherwise edit or change the story. Almost all of the character dialogue is taken directly from the book. As you might expect there is a good deal of narration, and that is faithful to the book and appears in the margins of the panels. This novel includes a few scenes and events that did not appear in the movie, but as a practical matter it reads and feels like an illustrated script or a detailed storyboard from the movie. But that begs the main question - what does the graphic illustration add? That is the big question and will probably give rise to the greatest variation in responses. The color palette is mostly soft pastels, which is fine for establishing scenes but drains much of the energy from dramatic scenes. The pencils and inks are very restrained, detail is minimal, and often the panels feel empty and the characters appear vague. Scout is always recognizable, but Jem and Dill and Cecil and Walter are often hard to tell apart. Atticus is sometimes a strong presence and sometimes very bland and generic looking. Boo is a disappointment and makes almost no visual impact in his scenes, especially in the dramatic conclusion. My bottom line was that this was a good and faithful graphic interpretation. It had its moments, and grew in strength and power as it proceeded. It would be nice if it helped younger readers into the story, but I'm not convinced it would hold a younger reader's interest or have a strong effect if that reader hadn't already read the book or seen the movie. (Please note that I received a free advance will-self-destruct-in-x-days Adobe Digital copy of this book without a review requirement, or any influence regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.)

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lucie

    First things first this isn’t a review of the story of To Kill a Mockingbird; you can read that review on my blog. This is a review of it being in the form of a graphic novel. Secondly, I am in awe of the beauty of the novel. Fordham, the adaptor and illustrator, managed to accurately capture the beauty that I and I’m sure many others envisioned when first reading this American Classic. He seems to capture the personalities and development of the children over the years through their appearance. First things first this isn’t a review of the story of To Kill a Mockingbird; you can read that review on my blog. This is a review of it being in the form of a graphic novel. Secondly, I am in awe of the beauty of the novel. Fordham, the adaptor and illustrator, managed to accurately capture the beauty that I and I’m sure many others envisioned when first reading this American Classic. He seems to capture the personalities and development of the children over the years through their appearance. He displays Atticus, I believe, through the eyes of Scout as he looks to be ageing which is repeatedly referenced, and like he has a world of knowledge in him. Scout looks like a young adventurous tomboy going against how society at the time said she should dress and behave. The illustrations are so beautifully detailed and vivid and he even takes quotations straight from the original. Although there were bits of the story missing simply to fit the new format, I believe this to be a faithful adaptation. As it is such a well-loved classic I’m sure some people like myself may be a little sceptical about how well it would adapt over to a completely different format, but my scepticism flew out the window as soon as I received it from the wonderful people at Penguin Random House. It has been my comfort book for a while now and I’m so grateful to have been given another way to enjoy this novel. I genuinely believe that this book will appeal to a whole new audience and existing fans such as myself. It is a book that delivers a message that you only fully understand a person when you see something from their point of view, ‘climb inside of his skin and walk around in it’. That is still so important to learn especially in children around Scouts age who have more to learn about the world. I still believe this book is so important for young people, so bringing out an edition that will certainly entice them is wonderful to see. It proves that this classic is just as relevant today as the day it came out. Overall, this is a beautifully illustrated book containing everything we love about the original classic in a new a vibrant format that will appeal to old lovers of the book and first timers alike.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Pretty Good I wasn't sure if I wanted to read this, an adaptation of Harper Lee's classic and my favorite book of all-time, To Kill a Mockingbird. The first time I read To Kill a Mockingbird (TKAM), I imagined what these characters would look like and then after I saw the movie, the first time, I visualized how these characters were in the movie, each time I reread the book. The Adapter, Fred Fordham, had a lot to live up to. It's tough to honor not only the integrity of the story, but the movie (a Pretty Good I wasn't sure if I wanted to read this, an adaptation of Harper Lee's classic and my favorite book of all-time, To Kill a Mockingbird. The first time I read To Kill a Mockingbird (TKAM), I imagined what these characters would look like and then after I saw the movie, the first time, I visualized how these characters were in the movie, each time I reread the book. The Adapter, Fred Fordham, had a lot to live up to. It's tough to honor not only the integrity of the story, but the movie (and how these characters have already been developed for a visual media), as well. Fordham did a credible job in this area. The characters are drawn to be relatable to today's youth, but still bear a strong resemblance to those portrayed in the movie. The Author's Note at the back of the book states that Fordham tried to stay true to the full-original text, but not everything is there. As a person who has read this book, multiple times, I recognized that there were pieces / parts missing, some of which were the more emotional parts of the story. I would recommend this, but with reservation.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Gabrielle Stoller

    Oh how I love To Kill a Mockingbird. It is one of the books that stands out to me the most when I think about high school reading. And with the renewed interest in the novel thanks to PBS's Great American Reads, I thought I would read it again.......and then I found the graphic novel at Barnes and Noble. The illustrations beautifully and fittingly capture the essence of this book. There is the visual impact of Atticus Finch defending Tom Robinson in the courtroom. (However, I kept picturing Grego Oh how I love To Kill a Mockingbird. It is one of the books that stands out to me the most when I think about high school reading. And with the renewed interest in the novel thanks to PBS's Great American Reads, I thought I would read it again.......and then I found the graphic novel at Barnes and Noble. The illustrations beautifully and fittingly capture the essence of this book. There is the visual impact of Atticus Finch defending Tom Robinson in the courtroom. (However, I kept picturing Gregory Peck) There are the quotes that make this novel so raw, so real, so necessary for the times. I loved being transported into this world once again. I do not know, though, if I like the graphic novel better than the novel. Did it do Harper Lee's work justice? I would say so. Whether I like it or not, graphic novels are a way to get a younger audience interested in classics. BUT it has been too long since I read "To Kill a Mockingbird." This read reminded me how much I loved the story. I'll need to do the original here again soon.

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