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Only to Sleep: A Philip Marlowe Novel

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The new Philip Marlowe novel, from Lawrence Osborne, a master of the psychological thriller In this brilliant new novel, commissioned by the Raymond Chandler estate, the acclaimed author Lawrence Osborne gives us a piercing psychological study of one of literature's most beloved and enduring detectives, told with a contemporary twist. It is an unforgettable addition to the The new Philip Marlowe novel, from Lawrence Osborne, a master of the psychological thriller In this brilliant new novel, commissioned by the Raymond Chandler estate, the acclaimed author Lawrence Osborne gives us a piercing psychological study of one of literature's most beloved and enduring detectives, told with a contemporary twist. It is an unforgettable addition to the Raymond Chandler canon. The year is 1989, the Reagan presidency has just come to an end, and detective Philip Marlowe--now in his seventy-seventh year--is on the case again. What country is this for old men? For Marlowe, this is his last roll of the dice, his swan song, and he is back on his home turf. Set between the border and badlands of Mexico and California, Marlowe's final assignment is to investigate the disappearance of Donald Zinn: supposedly drowned off his yacht in Mexico and leaving his much-younger wife a very rich woman. But is Zinn actually alive, and are the pair living off the spoils? Lawrence Osborne's unforgettable Marlowe investigates.


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The new Philip Marlowe novel, from Lawrence Osborne, a master of the psychological thriller In this brilliant new novel, commissioned by the Raymond Chandler estate, the acclaimed author Lawrence Osborne gives us a piercing psychological study of one of literature's most beloved and enduring detectives, told with a contemporary twist. It is an unforgettable addition to the The new Philip Marlowe novel, from Lawrence Osborne, a master of the psychological thriller In this brilliant new novel, commissioned by the Raymond Chandler estate, the acclaimed author Lawrence Osborne gives us a piercing psychological study of one of literature's most beloved and enduring detectives, told with a contemporary twist. It is an unforgettable addition to the Raymond Chandler canon. The year is 1989, the Reagan presidency has just come to an end, and detective Philip Marlowe--now in his seventy-seventh year--is on the case again. What country is this for old men? For Marlowe, this is his last roll of the dice, his swan song, and he is back on his home turf. Set between the border and badlands of Mexico and California, Marlowe's final assignment is to investigate the disappearance of Donald Zinn: supposedly drowned off his yacht in Mexico and leaving his much-younger wife a very rich woman. But is Zinn actually alive, and are the pair living off the spoils? Lawrence Osborne's unforgettable Marlowe investigates.

30 review for Only to Sleep: A Philip Marlowe Novel

  1. 4 out of 5

    Paromjit

    With what is now an exceedingly common practice in the publishing world, Lawrence Osborne revives the hard boiled noir series featuring the unforgettable Philip Marlowe, albeit his own version of Marlowe. Set in the coastal areas of California and Mexico, locations that serve well for the underhand dealings, shady characters, con merchants, and as Marlowe terms it, the 'able grables', all requisite requirements for a Philip Marlowe outing. Osborne does a particularly good job in making these pla With what is now an exceedingly common practice in the publishing world, Lawrence Osborne revives the hard boiled noir series featuring the unforgettable Philip Marlowe, albeit his own version of Marlowe. Set in the coastal areas of California and Mexico, locations that serve well for the underhand dealings, shady characters, con merchants, and as Marlowe terms it, the 'able grables', all requisite requirements for a Philip Marlowe outing. Osborne does a particularly good job in making these places come alive, his rich descriptions evoking oodles of atmosphere and the overpowering heat. There are bars with generators that invite customers to experience electric shocks for a free Mescal, an offer Marlowe can never resist, convinced the shocks have health giving properties for him. It is 1988, Reagan's presidential term is over, and a 72 year old retired Marlowe living in California receives a visit from two men from the Pacific Mutual Insurance Company. They are paying out a huge sum to the widow of Donald Zinn, Dolores Araya. Zinn's body was recovered on a beach in Mexico, identified by Dolores, and rather too quickly cremated. The insurance people have no reason to think fraud has been perpetrated, all the paperwork is in order. But something feels not quite right and fluent Spanish speaker Marlowe is the man they want to look into it, and they are willing to pay. Marlowe is bored, and despite his age and the frailties associated with it, he wants in, he wants that last adventure. He may be a shadow of his former self physically, and he certainly bemoans and resents the fact he is no longer in a position to do anything about the beautiful women that catch his eye, but he has his trusty cane, which harbours a deadly weapon should he need it, which is just as well because his survival will depend on it. Donald Zinn turns out to be con man, a chancer, whose entire wealth as a real estate developer is built on a mountain of debt that his death has rather neatly resolved, whilst leaving Dolores a wealthy woman as she cashes in on their assets. Zinn was a cokehead, living the good life of yachting, fishing, drinking and women, but a man with a crazy and nasty side to him. The beautiful Dolores Araya turns out to be a far more complex woman that Marlowe first thinks in this twisted last case for Marlowe, and he certainly has his own way of resolving the issues that arise, after all, he feels no particular loyalty to the insurance company. This was an enjoyable resurrection of the elderly, yet still iconic Philip Marlowe by Lawrence Osborne, who certainly captures elements of Marlowe in this novel. The spirit of Marlowe, still wanting to live the vibrant and adventurous life, even if it is without the dames, to once again have a case, even though the years have robbed him of much of his physical capabilities, is wonderfully conveyed. Marlowe is not afraid to die, and if he does, he will have died doing what he loves and does best, and who can argue with that? What I particularly liked was the strong sense of location and the wide range of characters that inhabit the pages of this gripping book. Many thanks to Random House Vintage for an ARC.

  2. 3 out of 5

    Carol

    2017 was the year I discovered Lawrence Osborne and my reading choices were summarily upended. By the end of the year, I had read 4 of his books – 2 fiction and 2 non-fiction – and, so far, in 2018, I’ve read 2 more. I’m purposefully leaving several back-catalog options available lest I sink helplessly into a deep funk when there are no more Osborne works left unread. (The foregoing disclosure is far more significant for purposes of assessing my objectivity (none) than knowing that I received a 2017 was the year I discovered Lawrence Osborne and my reading choices were summarily upended. By the end of the year, I had read 4 of his books – 2 fiction and 2 non-fiction – and, so far, in 2018, I’ve read 2 more. I’m purposefully leaving several back-catalog options available lest I sink helplessly into a deep funk when there are no more Osborne works left unread. (The foregoing disclosure is far more significant for purposes of assessing my objectivity (none) than knowing that I received a digital copy for review.) That aside, while I’m a determinedly eclectic reader, my fondness for detective, crime, mystery and thriller novels becomes apparent with a cursory glance at my GoodReads shelves. Add to that a preference for novels where most of the action takes place outside of the US and you see that I brought to Only to Sleep a fangirl’s high anticipation. What I did not bring to my reading of this novel was any set of expectations for the details of how Osborne would deliver against the opportunity he and John Banville, separately, received from the Raymond Chandler estate: to write a new Philip Marlowe novel. He includes an Author’s Note at the end that die-hard Chandler fans might want to peruse first. His core message? “I have tried to stay within the bounds of Marlowe’s fictional biography.” That he does. At the start of Only to Sleep, Philip Marlowe is 72 and retired. Hanging at a hotel bar. Needs a cane for navigation. A healthy, wealthy man has drowned. His widow is lovely and quite prompt in filing a claim on his life insurance policy. The insurer engages Marlowe to investigate the claim. Marlowe takes the case and begins to do what he does best, first in Baja, but mostly in Mexico. And Osborne is off to the races, as it were, giving us sentences like these: "Through my sleep moved old monsters and charlatans. The old men beaten in alleyways decades ago, the women resigned to their twilights." The plot is as opaque as the plots of the two Chandler novels I’ve read. Murky characters abound. The widow is only one of them. Marlowe is first intrigued, then determined, to get to the bottom of the mystery of the insured’s demise, but not necessarily in the way his client anticipated. Lots of traveling, hotels, adult beverages, dreams, darkness, bad guys, lies and misdirections. Osborne worked as a reporter on the US-Mexican border earlier in his career and brings those memories of the terrain and culture to the table here. Mostly, though? Read Only to Sleep for Osborne’s writing. “After they had left and as soon as the first stars had come out, a tolling bell began to echo from the hillsides above, and I let myself drift from the present backward in time. The sea became quiet. My cane rested between my legs almost like a companion dog while my real dog was off hunting chimera. The lights of the lobster boats came on, and I took my solitary tequila straight up.”

  3. 3 out of 5

    Karl

    “Only to Sleep: A Philip Marlowe Novel” written by Lawrence Osborne, is to the best of my knowledge, the third authorized Philip Marlowe to be written since the death of Raymond Chandler on 26 March 1959 in La Jolia Ca. with the blessing of the Chandler estate. And I say that it is lucky number three. Of the two previous attempts, which were written by two earlier mystery authors, it was asked when John Banville, was writing under his mystery novel pseudonym Benjamin Black, would he be able to pu “Only to Sleep: A Philip Marlowe Novel” written by Lawrence Osborne, is to the best of my knowledge, the third authorized Philip Marlowe to be written since the death of Raymond Chandler on 26 March 1959 in La Jolia Ca. with the blessing of the Chandler estate. And I say that it is lucky number three. Of the two previous attempts, which were written by two earlier mystery authors, it was asked when John Banville, was writing under his mystery novel pseudonym Benjamin Black, would he be able to pull it off or would it be like a Robert B Parker fiasco (first author attempt)? Parker was memorably dismissed by Martin Amis for having turned Marlowe, that hard-boiled walker of lonely streets, into an "affable goon". As Amis wrote on 27 January 1991, “If Raymond Chandler had written like Robert B. Parker, he wouldn't have been Raymond Chandler. He would have been Robert B. Parker, a rather less exalted presence. The posthumous pseudo-sequel never amounts to more than a nostalgic curiosity, and it is no great surprise that "Perchance to Dream" isn't much good.” But Banville lets us know from the very start of “The Black-Eyed Blonde” that we are in the safest of hands here. After all, it was the twenty third novel written by Bainville (his first and only Marlowe). Now we have the new guy, at least new to me, Lawrence Osborne, taking a stab at Chandler’s legendary PI. The story takes place in 1988. Marlowe has retired and has been living in Baja California for the last ten years. He is seventy two years old. Then one day, two men, representatives of the ‘Pacific Mutual insurance company’, call on Marlowe wishing to hire him to look into the death of a real-estate mogul so their exposure of his policy payout can be reduced. The mogul, a man named Donald Zinn, reportedly had died in Mexico while swimming. To his credit Mr. Osborne has captured the ‘flavor’ of Chandler’s writing. It’s not Chandler but so reminiscent of Chandler one can hear the metaphors. In my opinion this book was fantastic, perhaps one of the best I have read this year. To his credit Osborne has been able to pull it off without a hitch. The setting, the times, the location and the atmosphere were spot on perfect. Highly recommended to lovers of a good mystery.

  4. 3 out of 5

    Dave

    Chandler’s Marlowe is a towering figure in the lore of hardboiled gumshoes. He is so important to the literary genre that he stands nearly seventy feet tall and when he speaks the earth quivers. For such a towering figure, Chandler only bequeathed us seven full novels and a fistful of short stories. More recently, a host of writers have attempted to add to the Philip Marlowe lore, paying homage to Chandler’s work. Osborne offers us, not another story set in the mean streets of Marlowe’s 1940’s L Chandler’s Marlowe is a towering figure in the lore of hardboiled gumshoes. He is so important to the literary genre that he stands nearly seventy feet tall and when he speaks the earth quivers. For such a towering figure, Chandler only bequeathed us seven full novels and a fistful of short stories. More recently, a host of writers have attempted to add to the Philip Marlowe lore, paying homage to Chandler’s work. Osborne offers us, not another story set in the mean streets of Marlowe’s 1940’s Los Angeles, but an elder statesman Philip Marlowe. It’s the late 1980’s and this Marlowe is an old man with a cane, not as quick with his step. Here, Marlowe has retired to a village near Ensenada, drinking and idling away his golden years. Reluctantly, he accepts a final case, a final chance to do what he does best -investigate and figure it out. A young widow has claimed an insurance policy after her older husband’s body washes up on the beach in Mexico. And, here’s the elderly Marlowe plodding doggedly through Mexico trying to make sense of the little things he finds. What Osborne captures in this book is the spirit of windswept sadness and melancholy as he recalls his glorious past and investigates. It’s a Mexico filled with dry desert roads, quiet resorts, and lost dreams. For me, this book may have held initial appeal as a Marlowe story, but with very little actual action sequences, it offers a rather fascinating story that was quite an enjoyable read. Indeed, it’s a story that stands up in its own - even if the main character didn’t share a name and a background with a famous literary character. Thanks to Crown Publishing for providing a copy for review.

  5. 3 out of 5

    Faith

    "Carnivals were where old man could shine a little behind their masks and pretend that their vital spirits still worked." In 1989, Philip Marlowe is now 72, retired, living in Baja and contemplating the ways things have changed, not for the better, from the 1950s. He has a bad leg and is not particularly robust, but when he is approached by a couple of insurance investigators he agrees to take on one last case. Donald Zinn drowned in Mexico, making his much younger widow, Dolores Araya, very wea "Carnivals were where old man could shine a little behind their masks and pretend that their vital spirits still worked." In 1989, Philip Marlowe is now 72, retired, living in Baja and contemplating the ways things have changed, not for the better, from the 1950s. He has a bad leg and is not particularly robust, but when he is approached by a couple of insurance investigators he agrees to take on one last case. Donald Zinn drowned in Mexico, making his much younger widow, Dolores Araya, very wealthy. The investigators think that the details of Zinn's death may have been falsified and they want to know the truth. Marlowe may not have been their best choice for this mission. I've read several of the author's books and he is very good at both setting an atmosphere and creating morally ambiguous plots and characters, and he has accomplished that in this book. Marlowe winds up traveling through the out of the way places in Mexico that lure Americans who want to play and/or lose themselves. This book is a continuation of the Philip Marlowe series, acommissioned by the estate of Raymond Chandler. It's not necessary to have read any of the prior books. I wasn't looking forward to reading about old Marlowe. Mostly I just blocked out my memories of his younger self and treated this protagonist as a new character. That worked for me. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher.

  6. 3 out of 5

    Louise Wilson

    The year is 1989., the Reagan presidency had just come to an end, and Detective Philip Marlowe is on the case again. Philip Marlowe has retired and is living in Baja. He thinks about the way things have changed (not for the better). He has a bad leg but when he is approached from a couple of insurance investigators, he decides to take on one last case. Donald Zinn had drowned in Mexico, leaving his widow Dolores Araya a wealthy woman. Thinking that the details of Donald Zinn's deathhad been fals The year is 1989., the Reagan presidency had just come to an end, and Detective Philip Marlowe is on the case again. Philip Marlowe has retired and is living in Baja. He thinks about the way things have changed (not for the better). He has a bad leg but when he is approached from a couple of insurance investigators, he decides to take on one last case. Donald Zinn had drowned in Mexico, leaving his widow Dolores Araya a wealthy woman. Thinking that the details of Donald Zinn's deathhad been falsified, Marlowe may not have been the best person for this case. This is the first book I have read by this author. In this book, Marlowe, is 72 and a bit more cynical. He's not in his usual L. A. ! he's retired to Baja. He has taken on his swan song case. The descriptions in this book make you feel that you are taking part in this story. The pace is steady, it's well written and it's quite an enjoyable read. I would like to thank NetGalley, Random House UK, Vintage Publishing and the author Lawrence Osborne for my ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Marjorie

    At 72 years of age, Philip Marlowe has retired. But when he’s offered a case by an insurance company, he decides to have one last adventure. They want Marlowe to investigate the death of Donald Zinn. They’ve paid Zinn’s widow a very large sum of money but something doesn’t seem right and they think Marlowe is the man to get to the bottom of it. Who doesn’t know and love Philip Marlowe? What a perfect delight to have an author such as Lawrence Osborne bring him to life once again. The Robert Chan At 72 years of age, Philip Marlowe has retired. But when he’s offered a case by an insurance company, he decides to have one last adventure. They want Marlowe to investigate the death of Donald Zinn. They’ve paid Zinn’s widow a very large sum of money but something doesn’t seem right and they think Marlowe is the man to get to the bottom of it. Who doesn’t know and love Philip Marlowe? What a perfect delight to have an author such as Lawrence Osborne bring him to life once again. The Robert Chandler Estate asked Mr. Osborne to write this book and they couldn’t have picked a better author to do the job. Osborne has done a wonderful job of creating an older Marlowe. And he has done an excellent job of depicting a man who has led an adventurous life but now is headed to a more sedentary life and all of the conflicting emotions that go along with that. So enjoyable to once again join Marlowe as he takes on his last investigation. This is a bit different from Mr. Osborne’s other books in that he adapts the Chandler style of telling this story. But his particular talents still shine through. He’s lived in many countries and has quite a knack for detailing each location that he brings his characters to. Most of this book takes place in different locations in Mexico and the author brings his readers right there with him. With all the sights and smells and colors, you’ll completely forget that you’re not actually there. I do hope that one day Mr. Osborne will once again bring Mr. Marlowe out of retirement for another adventure. Recommended. This book was given to me by the publisher in return for an honest review.

  8. 3 out of 5

    Eric

    Only To Sleep is a novel featuring private investigator Philip Marlow by Lawrence Obsorne. I really had a difficult time rating this book because on one hand, if it had resonated with this reader more, the rating would have been higher, but for some reason, this novel just did not do that. Obsorne tells a tale where Marlow is on his elderly last legs working one more case and seeking to determine if a man has faked his death or not in order to collect on a large insurance settlement. The novel i Only To Sleep is a novel featuring private investigator Philip Marlow by Lawrence Obsorne. I really had a difficult time rating this book because on one hand, if it had resonated with this reader more, the rating would have been higher, but for some reason, this novel just did not do that. Obsorne tells a tale where Marlow is on his elderly last legs working one more case and seeking to determine if a man has faked his death or not in order to collect on a large insurance settlement. The novel is rich with descriptions and poignancy when it comes to Marlow, his age and his twilight years. Throughout the novel, and it does not offer a spoiler to tell this, Marlow knows this is probably his last investigation and maybe even one he should not have taken in the first place. The novel reads as a last hurrah for the Marlow character as he ponders his past, the things he had done and how sunset is just around the corner on his life. I believe many readers will really enjoy this novel a great deal and hope my three-star rating does not dissuade others from reading this novel.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    Lawrence Osborne is the third author who got asked by the Chandler estate to add to the the Philip Marlowe book, earlier entries being two books by Robert B Parker and John Banville. Which is certainly not a list of poor writers. Osborne chose to place the Philip Marlowe in the year 1988 with the lovely idea of having Marlowe being 72 years old, which makes a tough detective who can manage with his fists what his wits can not conquer. This is an older retired Marlowe who lives in Baja Mexico and Lawrence Osborne is the third author who got asked by the Chandler estate to add to the the Philip Marlowe book, earlier entries being two books by Robert B Parker and John Banville. Which is certainly not a list of poor writers. Osborne chose to place the Philip Marlowe in the year 1988 with the lovely idea of having Marlowe being 72 years old, which makes a tough detective who can manage with his fists what his wits can not conquer. This is an older retired Marlowe who lives in Baja Mexico and is winding down. He gets a request by an insurance company to investigate the death of man whose debtors were many. So Marlowe decides that he wants to chose his own curtain and shows that his skills as a PI are still as sharp as ever before. He does find out that death of the victim was faked and he keeps tracking them even if they want him dead and actually try as well. An absolute excellent entry in the Marlowe book series that does bring a great story that actually makes more sense than some of of Chandlers stories. I would gladly advise anybody who likes the Noir books to read this particular entry.

  10. 3 out of 5

    Ronald Koltnow

    This Raymond Chandler pastiche features the aging Philip Marlowe, in his 70s, on his last, we assume, investigation. It is certainly more Lawrence Osborne than Raymond Chandler; it reads in part like a travelogue, with attention to the details of place and custom. The good news is, as Osborne is one of our greatest living writers, this is a spellbinding tale of detours on the last highway. I chose to not think of the central character as Marlowe but as a man sort of my age who fears that the joy This Raymond Chandler pastiche features the aging Philip Marlowe, in his 70s, on his last, we assume, investigation. It is certainly more Lawrence Osborne than Raymond Chandler; it reads in part like a travelogue, with attention to the details of place and custom. The good news is, as Osborne is one of our greatest living writers, this is a spellbinding tale of detours on the last highway. I chose to not think of the central character as Marlowe but as a man sort of my age who fears that the joys of life have passed him by. He doesn't want love and sex, but he'd like to think that the possibility is still there. He doesn't need to be at the center of the action, but he needs to know that action is nearby. He is a knight errant whose nobility no longer has the luster it once did. In short, this is a melancholy tale, although not without humor. The aged Marlowe still has his detective chops, but does he still have his values? The exotic Mexican setting and the amount of drinks consumed are intoxicating. If this is Marlowe's last ride, at least it is an exciting one.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    Thanks to First to Read for the advance copy. Philip Marlowe in his dotage is not a pretty picture. Then again, he's still snooping about in a world that isn't so pretty itself. That he maintains any sly wit is impressive. However, without his penchant for, and selfless skill at, falling for the femme fatale, there would be no story. He maintains that dream-like progression through the events of the case, a clue here and there pushing the narrative forward despite Marlowe's every effort to hold s Thanks to First to Read for the advance copy. Philip Marlowe in his dotage is not a pretty picture. Then again, he's still snooping about in a world that isn't so pretty itself. That he maintains any sly wit is impressive. However, without his penchant for, and selfless skill at, falling for the femme fatale, there would be no story. He maintains that dream-like progression through the events of the case, a clue here and there pushing the narrative forward despite Marlowe's every effort to hold still and revel unimpressed in his own memories. The ending was foretold and spare and sad, satisfying only for its expected disappointment, or perhaps disappointing for its expected satisfaction. In that, this is indeed a good addition to the Marlowe legend.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Thomas

    It is always a heady prospect for an author to step into the shoes of another acclaimed author, especially one such as the beloved Raymond Chandler. And to then write a story featuring none other than Phillip Marlowe, perhaps the greatest of hardboiled gumshoes. That, my friends, is tempting the fates. But Lawrence Osborne is certainly no fly-by-night author and in this novel, I think he does the character, (and by extension, Chandler himself), justice. This novel is not about the Philip Marlow o It is always a heady prospect for an author to step into the shoes of another acclaimed author, especially one such as the beloved Raymond Chandler. And to then write a story featuring none other than Phillip Marlowe, perhaps the greatest of hardboiled gumshoes. That, my friends, is tempting the fates. But Lawrence Osborne is certainly no fly-by-night author and in this novel, I think he does the character, (and by extension, Chandler himself), justice. This novel is not about the Philip Marlow of 1940s Los Angeles, but rather a retired, 72-year old, slower-paced remnant who spends his time down Mexico way, drinking and idling away his time while observing the peculiarities of life. Reluctantly, he accepts a final case on behalf of an insurance company. It seems a young widow has claimed the insurance money after her older husband’s body has washed ashore on a Mexican beach. Marlowe, golden-tipped cane firmly in hand, proceeds to methodically try and figure out what has actually occurred, and verify the legitimacy of the claim. I think Mr. Osborne captures the tone of the original Chandler stories very well. There is that same sort of dreamy plot, without everything explicitly stated. There really isn’t all that much action throughout the novel, but the tension mounts just the same. Marlowe trails the persons of interest from one town to another, one hotel to the next, and all the while, drinking and interacting with the locals as much as those he is investigating. The subtle nature of the prose is striking nonetheless as the plot unfolds. Many readers will be skeptical of another Marlowe novel, not written by Chandler but I think this one will surprise them. And for those who have never read a Raymond Chandler story, it doesn’t matter. This is a solid, well-written novel that stands on its own regardless. Thanks to the publisher, Hogarth, for the opportunity to read an Advanced Reader's Copy of this novel

  13. 3 out of 5

    Alan Taylor

    “I just wanted one last outing. Every man does. One last play at the tables - it’s a common wish.” I approached this, Lawrence Osborne’s, Chandler Estate-authorised, Philip Marlowe novel, with some trepidation and a little scepticism. Raymond Chandler is my favourite writer and ‘The Little Sister’ the first ‘crime’ novel I remember reading. But Osborne’s decision to write about a 72-year old Marlowe was intriguing and, to some extent, prevents the novel from becoming pastiche, keeps it from being “I just wanted one last outing. Every man does. One last play at the tables - it’s a common wish.” I approached this, Lawrence Osborne’s, Chandler Estate-authorised, Philip Marlowe novel, with some trepidation and a little scepticism. Raymond Chandler is my favourite writer and ‘The Little Sister’ the first ‘crime’ novel I remember reading. But Osborne’s decision to write about a 72-year old Marlowe was intriguing and, to some extent, prevents the novel from becoming pastiche, keeps it from being just an inferior continuation of what Chandler did so well. In fact, it adds another dimension to the character. It is 1988. Philip Marlowe is retired, living physically in Mexico and mentally in the past, detesting old age. So, when an insurance company approaches him about a suspected fraud, he is quick to accept the challenge despite the reservations of others. ‘“You have a good life, Philip. You’re too old to knock people out. Stay down there and go fishing. They can’t be offering you that much. Or maybe you’re just bored.” “There’s that. I never thought retirement would be so sad.”’ A young widow has been awarded a huge benefit on the death of her much older husband whose rapid cremation following his drowning off the Mexican coast has raised the insurers’ suspicions. As Marlowe begins to investigate we sense that his aim is not really to find answers but to recapture the thrill of past cases. Osborne’s take on Marlowe is not Chandler - it really couldn’t be - but he does echo Chandler’s language without trying to compete and delivers a thoroughly enjoyable, if very sad, novel. Sad because Marlowe cannot recapture the life he had thirty, forty years ago. He finds himself falling for the widow but knows it will not be reciprocated. He drinks and suffers for it where before he would shrug it off. He continues to try to live the life of a tough guy despite knowing that it might kill him. ‘Years of this kind of life wears you down and makes you porous. You die off bit by bit. the stale grit of the road gets into your unconscious, a small voice arises and says to you, “This is the last time, there won’t be any more awakenings and thank god for that, eh?”’ I really liked this book despite my initial misgivings. Osborne makes great use of the Mexican locations he obviously knows well. He finds the dreamlike, slightly unreal quality that Chandler was so good at. But the knight errant is jaded, filled with regret, and chivalry is not so easy to maintain. If this is the end of Philip Marlowe, and it probably should be, it is a fitting end. ‘My dreams were of ships in gales, decks swept by relentless waves, and the threat of being lost at sea. Waters rushed past me and the ship heaved and sank; the bottom of the ocean clamoured with falling coins, glasses and sextants, and cocktail shakers. And there I drifted down among them until I came to rest upon a vast bed of silver and sand and fell asleep like a capsized bosun filled with water and salt.’

  14. 3 out of 5

    Sheryl

    For some reason I just couldn’t get into this novel. I love Phillip Marlow and was looking forward to reading this novel, but when you feel like you are reading a book just to finish it, you shouldn’t punish yourself by making yourself stick with it. It was well written, I don’t know if it was setting or what that made this a difficult read for me.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Maine Colonial

    Thanks to the publisher, Hogarth, for providing a free ARC. If you’re familiar with Raymond Chandler’s Philip Marlowe series, you know the laconic, melancholic style and the sun-blasted noir-ish atmosphere. Now imagine that Marlowe is retired and living in Mexico, on the Baja coast. He’s getting to be an old man, 72 with some creaky bones and occasional tremors, and he’s frequently sleepless or, when he does sleep, bothered by strange dreams. Worst of all, Marlowe is a little low on cash and a bit Thanks to the publisher, Hogarth, for providing a free ARC. If you’re familiar with Raymond Chandler’s Philip Marlowe series, you know the laconic, melancholic style and the sun-blasted noir-ish atmosphere. Now imagine that Marlowe is retired and living in Mexico, on the Baja coast. He’s getting to be an old man, 72 with some creaky bones and occasional tremors, and he’s frequently sleepless or, when he does sleep, bothered by strange dreams. Worst of all, Marlowe is a little low on cash and a bit bored. It’s a good time for the agents of Pacific Mutual Insurance to come calling from San Diego, offering a nice fee for a trace job. Their insured, Donald Zinn, supposedly drowned while drunkenly swimming out to a yacht. But they’re not convinced that the quickly-cremated corpse really was Zinn. If they pay the big insurance amount to Zinn’s widow, Dolores, will they really be paying Zinn himself for a con job? That’s what they hire Marlowe to find out. Marlowe’s investigation takes him from high-end resorts to fishing villages to dusty interior towns, pursuing leads with an aged man’s slow-motion zeal that becomes a near obsession. Maybe this will be his last job before the big sleep, and if it is, some days that feels OK with him. It’s a good story, and the style feels decently close to Chandler’s blend of smart-mouthed moral ambiguity and existential despair. Worth reading if you’re a hard-boiled novel fan, even if it does feel a little off-kilter to have Philip Marlowe doing his thing in 1988.

  16. 3 out of 5

    Sid Nuncius

    I’m afraid I found Only To Sleep pretty dull and rather aptly titled for me. As a lover of Chandler’s originals I approached it with some scepticism, especially after John Banville’s The Black-Eyed Blonde, which I thought was a pretty dreadful pastiche of Chandler’s style. This was stylistically better, but really didn’t add up to much. It’s a good idea in many ways to set the book in 1988, when Marlowe is 74 years old; his narrative voice is calmer, less snappy and the wisecracks and brilliant s I’m afraid I found Only To Sleep pretty dull and rather aptly titled for me. As a lover of Chandler’s originals I approached it with some scepticism, especially after John Banville’s The Black-Eyed Blonde, which I thought was a pretty dreadful pastiche of Chandler’s style. This was stylistically better, but really didn’t add up to much. It’s a good idea in many ways to set the book in 1988, when Marlowe is 74 years old; his narrative voice is calmer, less snappy and the wisecracks and brilliant similes almost absent. It’s reasonably plausible from an older Marlowe and avoids having to try to imitate the inimitable originals. The trouble is, it’s not very interesting. The plot, such as it is, revolves around a dodgy death in Mexico, to where Marlowe has now retired. He is persuaded to look into the matter by an insurance company who aren’t happy about the claim and then...not very much happens. I remember an old Private Eye parody of one of the le Carré TV adaptations along the lines of: Lengthy shot of Smiley walking slowly up a lane to the door of a house. Smiley knocks. Long pause. Window opens upstairs and a woman’s face appears. Smiley: “My name is Smiley. George Smiley.” Pause. Woman: “Go away!” Window slams. Long close-up of Smileys thoughtful face. Eventually he turns away. Lengthy shot of Smiley’s back as he walks slowly away from the house. Repeat for four following scenes. Well, I got rather that feeling with Only To Sleep. Marlowe talks to a lot of people whom we don’t know in unfamiliar places so it’s all rather hard to keep track of. A very slow picture of the dead man emerges. Slowly. And so on. Without Chandler’s matchless prose, human insight and wit to underpin it, the whole thing became dull to me and I began to skip, without feeling I was missing much. This isn’t the mess that The Black-Eyed Blonde was, but it’s not a significant addition to the Marlowe canon either. I can’t really recommend it. (My thanks to Vintage Digital for an ARC via NetGalley.)

  17. 5 out of 5

    Elaine Tomasso

    I would like to thank Netgalley and Random House UK, Vintage Publishing for an advance copy of Only to Sleep, a resurrection of Chandler's Philip Marlowe series. It's 1988 and a 72 year old Marlowe is not enjoying his retirement in rural Mexico. After 10 years of doing not much he's bored so when insurance company, Pacific Mutual, approaches him to look into a suspicious claim he jumps at the chance. Failed property developer Donald Zinn died in mysterious circumstances in Mexico and his young wi I would like to thank Netgalley and Random House UK, Vintage Publishing for an advance copy of Only to Sleep, a resurrection of Chandler's Philip Marlowe series. It's 1988 and a 72 year old Marlowe is not enjoying his retirement in rural Mexico. After 10 years of doing not much he's bored so when insurance company, Pacific Mutual, approaches him to look into a suspicious claim he jumps at the chance. Failed property developer Donald Zinn died in mysterious circumstances in Mexico and his young widow walked off with a cool $2 million so the insurance company wants some detail. I enjoyed Only to Sleep in a different way. It is an interesting concept to make Marlowe an old guy with all the attendant problems, rather than reprising his heyday of violence and dames. That said, I found it quite a difficult read. To my shame I have not read a Marlowe novel before so I have nothing to compare it with but I was quite impressed with the initial tone of world weary cynicism which seems in keeping with the hard boiled genre. My problem lies with the narrative which is in the first person and has a sort of stream of consciousness approach. Marlowe is constantly assessing his state of mind but as I didn't really get his thought processes I found it a bit impenetrable at times. The plot is fairly interesting but rather inconclusive so I didn't get the big rush of satisfaction I love at the end. I was, however, blown away by the lyricism of the descriptions. Mr Osborne paints a vivid picture of Mexico and Southern California- I could feel the heat, aridity, lawlessness and, at times, the exuberance and joie de vivre of the setting. It makes the book worth reading.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jeanette

    I am not familiar with the character Philip Marlowe, so wasn't too sure whether i could read this as a standalone. There is no mistaking that this book was very well written, but i do love a lot of action which there isn't in this book. If you enjoy a historical backdrop with wonderful descriptions set in Mexico and bars, then i do recommend this book. I do thank the Publishers for my copy. This is my honest review, which has been freely given.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Burt

    Was this a good book? Yes. Would I recommend it? Yes. Was it a Philip Marlowe novel? In name only and by that I mean the main character is named Philip Marlowe. This was not the Philip Marlowe of Raymond Chandler or even of Robert Parker. None of the dialogue had the Chandler snap. The mean streets of Mexico are not the mean streets of LA. The book is both literate and literary and that last is the problem, it is too literary. Rather than Chandler the book reminded me more of the Quirke novels w Was this a good book? Yes. Would I recommend it? Yes. Was it a Philip Marlowe novel? In name only and by that I mean the main character is named Philip Marlowe. This was not the Philip Marlowe of Raymond Chandler or even of Robert Parker. None of the dialogue had the Chandler snap. The mean streets of Mexico are not the mean streets of LA. The book is both literate and literary and that last is the problem, it is too literary. Rather than Chandler the book reminded me more of the Quirke novels written by John Banville as Benjamin Black than of any of the Marlowe novels or even short stories by Raymond Chandler. It isn't until the final 20 or so pages that we get the adjectival descriptions that Chandler was famous for. In this novel Marlowe is 72 and he's not aged well. Hell, I'm 71, and Marlowe made me feel a lot younger! If you are a lover of Chandler's Marlowe read this book anyway and see what you think. The main character could just as easily have been John Smith. The four stars are for this book as a stand alone not as a novel in the Marlowe pantheon.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Elliot

    A reboot of a long lost, favorable PI, Philip Marlowe comes out of retirement to assist an insurance firm in investigating possible fraud. Lawrence Osborne does an excellent job capturing the hard, callous, ambivalent Marlowe as if he never went away. Osborne also emulates Chandler's finesse and turns of phrases regarding similes and metaphors. However, there are a few things that bug me. 1) Marlowe is 72, set in the early 1980s...he's confronted by a few younger people, but Marlowe when making a A reboot of a long lost, favorable PI, Philip Marlowe comes out of retirement to assist an insurance firm in investigating possible fraud. Lawrence Osborne does an excellent job capturing the hard, callous, ambivalent Marlowe as if he never went away. Osborne also emulates Chandler's finesse and turns of phrases regarding similes and metaphors. However, there are a few things that bug me. 1) Marlowe is 72, set in the early 1980s...he's confronted by a few younger people, but Marlowe when making a random flashback, he adds, "Back in the day..." I have a hard time seeing Marlowe using this phrase. I feel as though, he would make a snide comment about the young person's ignorance of the past or something along those lines. 2) The descriptions of people, landscape, etc. are long winded and borderline Jules Verne. Most of Chandler's charm was using few words to paint a picture. Osborne gets a little too wrapped up in Marlowe's environment and surroundings.

  21. 5 out of 5

    William Koon

    Two of my favorite writers have worked with Raymond Chandler’s material, John Banville and William Faulkner. And now the superb Lawrence Osborne throws his hat into the soup, portraying Marlowe as an old, crippled man with memories of better times. In a somewhat convoluted plot that ranges from El Centro to various Mexican locales, Osborne has the old fellow bumbling along, sardonically. I wish the Chandler trust would be happy releasing the old books. We just did not need Only To Sleep.

  22. 4 out of 5

    David C Ward

    The NYTimes liked this for some reason, probably because the Times has a very poor grasp of popular culture. The premise is a late 70 year old Marlowe comes out of retirement in 1988 for one last tilt at the windmill. Not only is this not a passable homage to Raymond Chandler, it’s not even very good as a mystery. The problem is very poor writing - everything is ornate and overdescribed as well as suffused with a sense of world weariness that is leaden. It has nothing like chandler’s brisk irony The NYTimes liked this for some reason, probably because the Times has a very poor grasp of popular culture. The premise is a late 70 year old Marlowe comes out of retirement in 1988 for one last tilt at the windmill. Not only is this not a passable homage to Raymond Chandler, it’s not even very good as a mystery. The problem is very poor writing - everything is ornate and overdescribed as well as suffused with a sense of world weariness that is leaden. It has nothing like chandler’s brisk irony and it’s hard to believe Osborne thinks he is inhabiting Marlowe and Chandler’s world. Like General Sternwood’s orchids it’s over ripe and corrupt. The case involves a disappearance and insurance fraud - with complications. If you care. You won’t.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Shoshana

    When I was seven years old my father was thirty-eight. His birthday was coming up and I did not want him to turn thirty-nine. He said he couldn’t help it, and that was when I first understood that my father could not do everything. Philip Marlowe, it seemed to me, was also eternally thirty-eight. Until this book. In “Only to Sleep,” Philip Marlowe is seventy-two, retired in Mexico, slowly drinking himself to death and using a cane. But he is still the Philip Marlowe of “The Big Sleep,” and “The When I was seven years old my father was thirty-eight. His birthday was coming up and I did not want him to turn thirty-nine. He said he couldn’t help it, and that was when I first understood that my father could not do everything. Philip Marlowe, it seemed to me, was also eternally thirty-eight. Until this book. In “Only to Sleep,” Philip Marlowe is seventy-two, retired in Mexico, slowly drinking himself to death and using a cane. But he is still the Philip Marlowe of “The Big Sleep,” and “The Little Sister.” Chandler himself would recognize him. Raymond Chandler said of his hero, “Down these mean streets a man must go who is not himself mean, who is neither tarnished nor afraid. The detective must be a complete man and a common man yet an unusual man. He must be, to use a rather weathered phrase, a man of honor. He talks as the man of his age talks, that is with rude wit, a lively sense of the grotesque, a disgust for sham, and a contempt for pettiness.” This is vintage Marlowe, which means that the plot is convoluted and the prose is dense. I don’t like spoilers so that is all I am going to say about it. In my opinion, Osborne gets it just right. Much of the book takes place in Mexico and made me wish that I knew more Spanish. If you have always loved Philip Marlowe, or if you are somehow not acquainted with Chandler’s iconic detective, do yourself a favor and read this book, it is well worth your time. I received an ARC from the publisher and NetGalley for my honest opinion.

  24. 3 out of 5

    Jake

    (3.5) I was recently at a book signing for author Megan Abbott. A week before the signing, she published an article on trying to understand her love for Raymond Chandler’s work in the age of #MeToo. Chandler’s most famous detective, Private Investigator Philip Marlowe, is written as a notorious misogynist who is often quite brutal to women. I was fortunate to talk to Abbott a little about her piece and we both agreed that while Chandler has his problems, he’s also the godfather of most modern da (3.5) I was recently at a book signing for author Megan Abbott. A week before the signing, she published an article on trying to understand her love for Raymond Chandler’s work in the age of #MeToo. Chandler’s most famous detective, Private Investigator Philip Marlowe, is written as a notorious misogynist who is often quite brutal to women. I was fortunate to talk to Abbott a little about her piece and we both agreed that while Chandler has his problems, he’s also the godfather of most modern day American detective novels. Ross Macdonald’s Lew Archer series is my personal favorite but there is no Archer without Marlowe. Considering the iconic standing of the character, Lawrence Osborne is taking on a heavy task by writing a new Marlowe novel. He’s not the first to do it: famed mystery scribe Robert Parker has written two, while Benjamin Black’s most recent effort The Black-Eyed Blonde is in movie pre-production with Liam Neeson set to star. But still, this is a challenge that should only be handled by a capable writer. Osborne is a capable writer. More than competent, even. His dialogue is sound, his characterization good. And unlike Parker or Black who kept their books in Chandler’s timeline, Osborne decides to age Marlowe into his 70s and park him in 1980s Mexico. He’s retired and living a leisurely life, certainly in better health than he was when we last saw him in Playback. I could buy the idea that if Marlowe quit smoking and cut down on drinking, he could be living this life. The problem with the book is: it’s not written by Raymond Chandler. It’s got the body of a Marlowe novel. I could definitely see a 72-year old Humphrey Bogart chasing his prey through Mexico. But it doesn’t have the soul. Chandler’s writing style is so unique and sharp. It’s difficult to mimic and to his credit, Osborne doesn’t try. But it’s impossible to separate the style from the character. It’s more competent than well-written Marlowe fan fiction, which is essentially what The Black-Eyed Blonde is. But it feels like someone took an outline from a Chandler book and just ran with it. So what I don’t understand is why Osborne didn’t just try to do his own thing. As said above, I’m not a Marlowe fanboy. I recognize the importance of his character but I’m not defensive that someone else would give it a go with him. I just wish they had done so with more verve. This is a better book than The Black-Eyed Blonde but the reason why I gave both of them three stars is Black decided to set his in LA and make it an LA specific tale and at least try to be Marlowe, while Osborne borrowed Marlowe’s name and clothes, sanded the edges of his attitude and called it a book. Black tries to go there and while he doesn’t have the reach to do it, I admire the hustle. Osborne has gifts but decided to settle. If you put the best parts of Black’s style with Osborne’s capability and plotting, you’d probably have a Marlowe book that would satisfy me. If nothing else, this book made me want to read more of Osborne’s work, which I look forward to in the near future.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Joan

    It's been decades since I have read a Marlowe novel. This one has a slower pace than I recall of the originals. I felt the plot, while possible, just took a long time to get to the important points. Marlowe seemed to have lost his edge. He went some places and entered some dangerous situations that did not seem very smart to me. Marlowe is a dark character sloshing in alcohol. I had hoped he would at least be a moral character, doing the right thing when called upon. He was not. With the slow pa It's been decades since I have read a Marlowe novel. This one has a slower pace than I recall of the originals. I felt the plot, while possible, just took a long time to get to the important points. Marlowe seemed to have lost his edge. He went some places and entered some dangerous situations that did not seem very smart to me. Marlowe is a dark character sloshing in alcohol. I had hoped he would at least be a moral character, doing the right thing when called upon. He was not. With the slow pace and unlikable Marlowe, had this been my first novel about Marlowe, I would not have read another. Going into Mexico was interesting. Osborne did a good job of taking readers into the scenes with good descriptions. Ultimately this novel seemed to be more about Mexico in the 1980s than it did about Marlowe. I received a complimentary digital copy of this book from the publisher. My comments are an independent and honest review.

  26. 3 out of 5

    Aristotle

    Reminiscing I didn't know who Philip Marlowe was having never read a Marlowe novel or watched a movie. So this is a stand alone review. Philip Marlowe a 72 year old Private Investigator is hired by an insurance company to verify that the death of one Donald Zinn was an accident and not a scam before they payoff his young widow with a two million dollar insurance policy. That's the plot. How exciting can it be following around a 72 year old private investigator be? The answer is not very. Phillip spen Reminiscing I didn't know who Philip Marlowe was having never read a Marlowe novel or watched a movie. So this is a stand alone review. Philip Marlowe a 72 year old Private Investigator is hired by an insurance company to verify that the death of one Donald Zinn was an accident and not a scam before they payoff his young widow with a two million dollar insurance policy. That's the plot. How exciting can it be following around a 72 year old private investigator be? The answer is not very. Phillip spends his days drinking and reminiscing. Reliving his old glory days and indulging in enjoyable recollection of his past conquests. I didn't find Phillip a likable character and his drinking made me feel sad for him. The story wasn't interesting unless you find swashbuckling septuagenarians high drama and the conclusion wasn't very satisfying. Skip it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    For the fourth post-Chandler Marlowe novel, Lawrence Osborne makes a radical shift. Set in 1988, Marlowe is 72 retired and a little less of a romantic when he decides to help an insurance company investigate a suspicious death in Mexico. He's not the Marlowe you'll recall from "The Big Sleep" or "Farewell, My Lovely", but he's still good company and his wanderings south of the border have a melancholy, dreamlike quality. Less a mystery than a character portrait, a meditation by a man who feels t For the fourth post-Chandler Marlowe novel, Lawrence Osborne makes a radical shift. Set in 1988, Marlowe is 72 retired and a little less of a romantic when he decides to help an insurance company investigate a suspicious death in Mexico. He's not the Marlowe you'll recall from "The Big Sleep" or "Farewell, My Lovely", but he's still good company and his wanderings south of the border have a melancholy, dreamlike quality. Less a mystery than a character portrait, a meditation by a man who feels that time and life have passed him by.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tony

    The concept of a 72-year old Marlowe coming out of retirement in 1988 was very appealing to me. I typically don’t like beloved characters being taken out of their original time periods, but this was not a reboot, it was a sort of epilogue to a unique career for Philip Marlowe. I thought it worked very well. The plot is a bit convoluted, but so were Chandler’s plots and they are still classics. So in that respect I thought Osborne got it right. His descriptions of place, scenery, and mood went on The concept of a 72-year old Marlowe coming out of retirement in 1988 was very appealing to me. I typically don’t like beloved characters being taken out of their original time periods, but this was not a reboot, it was a sort of epilogue to a unique career for Philip Marlowe. I thought it worked very well. The plot is a bit convoluted, but so were Chandler’s plots and they are still classics. So in that respect I thought Osborne got it right. His descriptions of place, scenery, and mood went on a bit long in some parts, but the story moved along quickly and I was never bored. Most of the issues I took with the book were personal nitpicks and not structural. For example, Osborne’s musical references could have been a bit more specific to 1988 and not just general 80s musical acts. I don’t fault the book for those issues because Osborne is a wonderful writer and the book is solid. I enjoyed this book more than previous non-Chandler Marlowe efforts because it showed the character in a new way I hadn’t seen him before. There have been a lot of comments in other reviews about Marlowe’s questionable morals in this book, but I didn’t seem to get that impression. He’s older and a bit more cynical, which is to be expected. But in the end he appears to do the right thing and I didn’t feel his behavior compromised the character in what would be his early 70s. However, my biggest issue with the book is that Marlowe is completely removed from Los Angeles. While Chandler had Marlowe occasionally venture out of LA in some of his books, Marlowe was always tied to the City of Angels in some way. LA was just as much a character of the books as Marlowe himself, and to completely remove that from the story is a detriment. I understand that Osborne was writing about a place and time he knew very well, and he wrote about Mexico in the late 1980s splendidly. I enjoyed seeing Marlowe there, yet it wasn’t the right place for an entire Marlowe adventure to take place. It felt, at times, like Marlowe was wandering around a dream that wasn’t totally real to him. This made me wonder why the Chandler estate continues to choose writers to carry on Marlowe, who have no connection to Los Angeles? This book gets 4 stars because Osborne did write a very fine book and it was one of my favorite reads of the summer. But how about next time asking Eddie Muller to write a Marlowe? Or here’s an idea…how about someone like Christa Faust? I hope Chandler’s executors are listening.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Colette Lamberth

    Sad to say, I struggled with this book. The slow pace of it fitted really well with the aged Marlowe but I just wasn’t engaged by it.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Peter Ackerman

    What a yawner. When my mother gifted me with I was very excited. What is not to like about a new Philip Marlowe novel, authorized by Raymond Chandler's estate? Still, there is something missing. Perhaps it was the rather "forced" metaphor near the beginning (a trap for anyone writing like Chandler). It might have been the exasperatingly slow to unfold story. Is this Marlowe or Agatha Christie's Miss Marple? What I believe is missing is another Chandler touch, and that is a sense of time. We know f What a yawner. When my mother gifted me with I was very excited. What is not to like about a new Philip Marlowe novel, authorized by Raymond Chandler's estate? Still, there is something missing. Perhaps it was the rather "forced" metaphor near the beginning (a trap for anyone writing like Chandler). It might have been the exasperatingly slow to unfold story. Is this Marlowe or Agatha Christie's Miss Marple? What I believe is missing is another Chandler touch, and that is a sense of time. We know from our aging detective narrator that he is in the mid 1980's, but other than a reference to "Guns 'n Roses" (and really, was any 70 something year old in '85 even aware of GNR?), there is no sense of time/place in this book. If this was not driven by Marlow, the author could have put his own creation in this novel and what we would be left with is what we have...a not very good story, written well. I do not need to pick this one up again...ever.

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